English
Le texte figurant ci-dessous n'a pas de valeur officielle. Pour consulter le texte officiel, veuillez vous reporter à la version bilingue (PDF).

Le texte figurant ci-dessous constitue la codification la plus récente en date du 21 sept. 2023.

Il est en vigueur depuis 1er mars 2019.

Dernière modification intégrée : R.M. 55/2019

 
Version(s) précédente(s)

Note : Les versions codifées antérieurement ne sont pas accessibles en ligne.

 
Modifications
Modification Titre Enregistrement Publication
55/2019 Règlement modifiant le Règlement sur l'aménagement du territoire 19 févr. 2019 20 févr. 2019
Rechercher dans ce règlement
Afficher les articles ou paragraphes avec des résultats.
Rechercher
         

La recherche ne tient pas compte des majuscules.


Provincial Planning Regulation, M.R. 81/2011

Règlement sur l'aménagement du territoire, R.M. 81/2011

The Planning Act, C.C.S.M. c. P80

Loi sur l'aménagement du territoire, c. P80 de la C.P.L.M.


Regulation 81/2011
Registered June 20, 2011

bilingual version (HTML)

Règlement 81/2011
Date d'enregistrement : le 20 juin 2011

version bilingue (HTML)
Provincial Land Use Policies enacted

1   The Provincial Land Use Policies, as set out in Part 3 of the Schedule, are enacted.

Adoption des Politiques provinciales d'usage des biens-fonds

1   Sont adoptées les Politiques provinciales d'usage des biens-fonds établies à la partie 3 de l'annexe.

Development plans

2   Development plans must be prepared in accordance with the requirements of Part 4 of the Schedule.

Plans de mise en valeur

2   Les plans de mise en valeur sont élaborés conformément aux exigences de la partie 4 de l'annexe.

Livestock operations

3(1)   For the purpose of section 1.1 of The Planning Act, the required degree of interrelationship between individuals, corporations, partnerships or other entities for deeming related nearby livestock operation to be one operation is as set out in Part 5 of the Schedule.

Exploitations de bétail

3(1)   Pour l'application de l'article 1.1 de la Loi sur l'aménagement du territoire, la partie 5 de l'annexe indique les liens qui doivent exister entre des particuliers, des corporations, des sociétés en nom collectif ou d'autres entités pour que des exploitations de bétail liées et situées à proximité l'une de l'autre soient considérées comme une exploitation unique.

3(2)   For the purposes of subsection 72(3) of The Planning Act, the siting and setback requirements for livestock operations are as set out in Part 5 of the Schedule.

3(2)   Pour l'application du paragraphe 72(3) de la Loi, les distances de retrait relatives à l'emplacement des exploitations de bétail sont mentionnées à la partie 5 de l'annexe.

Definitions

4(1)   Terms that are italicized and in bold in the Schedule are defined in Part 1. For other terms, the normal meaning of the word applies.

Définitions

4(1)   Les termes en italique et en gras dans l'annexe sont définis dans la partie 1. Dans le cas des autres termes, le sens habituel du terme s'applique.

4(2)   Terms may be italicized and in bold only in specific places; for these terms, the defined meaning applies where they are italicized and in bold and the normal meaning applies where they are not.

4(2)   Dans certains cas, les termes apparaissent en italique et en gras seulement à des endroits en particulier. Pour ces termes, le sens défini s'applique quand ils sont en italique et en gras, et le sens habituel s'applique s'ils ne sont ni en italique ni en gras.

Reference aids

5   Part 2 (Introduction) of the Schedule and the provincial interest statements in Parts 3 and 4 are included to provide context for the reader, but do not form part of the Schedule.

Outils de référence

5   La partie 2 (Introduction) de l'annexe et les intérêts de la province énoncés aux parties 3 et 4 ne visent qu'à fournir un contexte au lecteur et ne font pas partie de l'annexe.

Manitoba Regulation 184/94 repealed

6   The Provincial Land Use Policies Regulation, Manitoba Regulation 184/94, is repealed.

Abrogation du Règlement sur les politiques provinciales d'occupation des sols

6   Est abrogé le Règlement sur les politiques provinciales d'occupation des sols, R.M. 184/94.


SCHEDULE

PART 1
DEFINITIONS

agricultural operation means an agricultural, horticultural or silvicultural operation that is conducted in order to produce agricultural products on a commercial basis, and includes

a) the production of crops, including grains, oil seeds, hay and forages, and horticultural crops, including vegetables, fruit, mushrooms, sod, trees, shrubs and greenhouse crops;

b) the use of land for livestock operations and grazing;

c) the production of eggs, milk and honey;

d) the raising of game animals, fur-bearing animals, game birds, bees and fish;

e) the processing necessary to prepare an agricultural product for distribution from the farm gate;

f) the operation of agricultural machinery and equipment, including the tillage of land and the application of fertilizers, manure, soil amendments and pesticides, whether by ground or aerial application;

g) the storage, use or disposal of organic wastes for agricultural purposes. (exploitation agricole)

agricultural producer means a person who produces and markets an agricultural product. (producteur agricole)

brownfield sites means abandoned, vacant, derelict or under-utilized commercial or industrial sites that may be contaminated. (friche industrielle)

Canada Land Inventory means the maps prepared by the governments of Canada and Manitoba showing an evaluation of the capability of the land to support agriculture, forestry, wildlife and recreation. (Inventaire des terres du Canada)

capital region means the municipalities referred to in The Capital Region Partnership Act. (région de la capitale)

cottage means a rural residential use that is intended to be used seasonally or on a part-time basis. (chalet)

critical and significant wildlife habitat means habitat type crucial to the size, distribution or stability of a wildlife species in an area, and includes

a) land presently wooded or that has an appropriate mix of wooded and open areas with a Canada Land Inventory class designation 1,1W, 2, 2W, 3, 3W or 4 for ungulates;

b) land with a Canada Land Inventory class designation 1, 2, 3 or 4 for wetlands;

c) areas of unbroken native prairie greater than 20 acres in size; and

d) habitat important to migratory species and for the maintenance of a wildlife population in a local area. (habitat faunique essentiel)

design flood means a flood magnitude on a water body that, on average, is expected to occur once during a one hundred year period. (crue nominale)

drinking water system means a system used to pump, store, treat and distribute drinking water, and includes the facilities and services used in the provision of drinking water. (réseau d'eau potable)

erosion in respect of land, means land that, within a 50-year period, may be eroded away or become unstable due to the action of water contained in an adjacent water body. (érosion)

farmstead site means the portion of land of an agricultural operation, usually surrounded by a well-defined shelterbelt, that includes the habitable residence of the agricultural producer and the buildings and facilities associated with the agricultural operation. (ferme)

greenstone belt means an area of metamorphosed volcanic and sedimentary rocks in the Precambrian shield that has high potential for the discovery of base metals and gold. (zone de roches vertes)

heritage resource means a heritage site, a heritage object, and any work or assembly of works of nature or human endeavour that is of value for its archaeological, paleontological, prehistoric, historic, cultural, natural, scientific or aesthetic features, and may be in a form of sites or objects or combination of them. (richesse du patrimoine)

intensification means developing at a higher density than currently exists, and includes redeveloping property, expanding or converting existing buildings, reusing brownfield sites, developing under-utilized property, infill development and mixing compatible land uses. (densification)

land subject to flooding means land that

a) is inundated by floods up to and including the design flood;

b) has a known history of flooding; or

c) experiences flooding during an flood event of a magnitude specified by the Province in areas protected by flood control works. (bien-fonds exposé aux inondations)

mineral means a substance that is a mineral under The Mines and Minerals Act and the regulations made under that Act. (minéral)

non-resource-related use means a land use or development whose location is not dependent on a particular natural resource including residential, commercial, industrial, indoor recreational uses, playing fields, amusements and golf courses. (usage non axé sur les ressources)

planning area means the area to which a development plan applies. (zone d'aménagement du territoire)

planning authority means the board of a planning district or the council of a municipality that is required to adopt a development plan. (autorité chargée de l'aménagement du territoire)

PLUPs means the Provincial Land Use Policies. (PPUB)

prime agricultural land means the following land:

a) land composed of mineral soil determined to be of dryland Agricultural Capability Class 1, 2 or 3;

b) a land unit of one quarter section or more, or a river lot, in which 60% or more of the land is dryland Agricultural Capability Class 1, 2 or 3;

c) land composed of organic soil determined to be of dryland Agricultural Capability Class O1, O2 or O3;

d) land determined to be of Irrigation Suitability Class 1A, 1B, 2A or 2B. (terre agricole à fort rendement)

provincial natural land includes

a) provincial parks, ecological reserves and provincial forests;

b) land designated under The Wildlife Act as a refuge, special conservation area and wildlife management area;

c) land, freshwater and marine areas designated under an enactment as a protected area; and

d) private lands owned by conservation agencies that are recognized as protected areas under an agreement. (terre naturelle provinciale)

public services means infrastructure, services and amenities provided to the public, including

a) infrastructure used for water and wastewater, transportation, solid waste and other utilities;

b) water control works, including dykes, dams, surface or subsurface drains, improved natural water bodies, canals, tunnels, bridges, culverts, boreholes or contrivances for carrying or conducting water that

i) temporarily or permanently alters or may alter the flow of water or the level of a water body, or

ii) changes or may change the location or direction of the flow of water,

c) parks, schools and recreational facilities; and

d) health and social services and police, fire and other emergency services. (services publics)

resource-related use means a use that is directly dependent on the land or resource base, such as agriculture, quarrying, forestry, fishing, trapping, hunting, outdoor recreation and hydro and wind energy production. (usage axé sur les ressources)

riparian area means an area of land on the banks of or near a water body that, due to the influence of water, is capable of naturally supporting an ecosystem that is distinct from the ecosystem of the adjacent upland areas. (zone riveraine)

rural residential means a non-farm, single family residential development with a larger lot size and that is located outside an urban centre. (ensemble résidentiel rural)

settlement area means the urban centres and designated rural residential and cottage areas. (zone d'habitation)

urban centre means an incorporated city, town or village, and includes a settled area that has

a) 25 or more permanent residences;

b) a mix of commercial and community services; and

c) a historic basis or place name. (centre urbain)

viable lower class land means land, other than prime agricultural land, that is used for agricultural operations or that has been used for agriculture operations in the past and continues to have the potential to be used for that purpose. (bien-fonds viable de classe inférieure)

wastewater management system means a system used to collect, store, treat, distribute and dispose of wastewater, and includes the facilities and services associated the management of wastewater. (système de gestion des eaux usées)

water includes both surface and groundwater. (eau)

water and wastewater infrastructure includes a drinking water system and a wastewater management system. (infrastructure d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées)

water body means a body of flowing or standing water, whether naturally or artificially created and whether the flow or presence of water is continuous, intermittent or occurs only during a flood, and includes lakes, rivers, creeks, streams, sloughs, marshes, swamps and wetlands and the frozen surface of any of them. (étendue d'eau)

PART 2 INTRODUCTION

WHY PROVINCIAL LAND USE POLICIES?

Planning is a process all of us use to achieve an objective or goal. We plan for things we want to happen, for things we expect to happen or because we want to prevent undesirable outcomes.

Planning is a proactive practice — it is the opposite of waiting to see how things turn out and then responding to what is needed. With a reactive approach, decisions can become rushed, costly and may miss strategic opportunities.

Land use planning employs a proactive approach to making decisions about the use and development of land and resources. The focus is on moving toward a common vision or goal that represents the public interest; it is not simply restricting or regulating development.

In moving toward the sustainable development of Manitoba, planning must address a number of strategic priorities concurrently, such as sustainable infrastructure, clean energy, public health and safety, climate change mitigation and adaptation, economic diversification and competitiveness, housing affordability, resource conservation and water quality protection.

The Province recognizes that the manner in which land and resources are used has direct impact on these priorities. For example, how communities are planned and designed influences how people live, their level of resource consumption and their corresponding pollution production, such as greenhouse gas emissions. Because of this interdependence, the Province is interested in how land use planning and development occurs in Manitoba.

This interest is expressed in the Provincial Land Use Policies (the "PLUPs"). The PLUPs are based on the principles of sound land use planning, which are meant to guide the preparation of development plans, as well as ongoing land use and development decisions, to ensure they support the Province's strategic priorities and prevent undesirable outcomes. The principles of sound land use planning are reflected throughout the PLUPs and are summarized as follows:

Long-term vision — because land use decisions have long-term impacts, they must be future-oriented and connected to an overall vision or plan. This requires that individual developments be coordinated, strategic, anticipate needs and support the achievement of community priorities. Without a vision, incremental decisions are made in isolation and can lead to unforeseen conflicts and cumulative negative impacts.

Public interests — a traditional motivation for land use planning is the protection of the public interest. The development of land and resources has both costs and benefits; land use and development decisions must balance private gain with the costs that may be incurred by the public, and evaluate short-term profits against long-term costs.

Compatibility — land uses and developments that are planned and designed to be compatible with their surroundings will prevent or minimize conflicts and avoid dangers to public health, safety and the environment. When land uses are not compatible, they can result in negative impacts on people, property, investment and the environment, such as

nuisances, including noise, dust, odours;

financial expenditures by both private operators and the public to deal with legal issues and complaints;

danger to human health and safety and damage to property and investments from hazards, such as flooding, and the resulting public expenditures for evacuation and compensation;

additional development costs to mitigate conflict.

Mitigation and adaptation — the ability to anticipate, mitigate and adapt to change speaks to a community's resiliency. Managing change, such as shifts in population, demographics, economics, ecology and climatic norms requires that local plans and policies be flexible, not static. It requires local capacity to anticipate challenges and evaluate land use and development decisions on the basis of how well they mitigate the negative effects of change or adapt to those effects.

Sustainability — sustainable development is an approach to land use that views the goals of economic development, quality of life, public health and environmental protection as interrelated and not "either/or" situations. A sustainable development approach also recognizes and places value on the important functions of the ecosystem and ensures these can be protected from or incorporated into development to provide the best outcomes for both the built and natural environment, both now and into the future.

Optimization and efficiency — the optimal and efficient use of land, resources and existing public investments, such as infrastructure, can reduce costs to the public, promote innovation and competitiveness and help conserve valuable resources. Land that is developed thoughtfully and strategically can improve affordability, quality of life and services to the public.

Comprehensiveness — land use decisions, policies and programs have impact on and are influenced by a number of interest areas. Planning must consider the interconnections between land use and elements like transportation, housing, social services and cultural differences. A comprehensive approach that considers a variety of elements, can address multiple issues while ensuring it does not ignore problems or create new ones.

Integration — land use decisions, policies and programs must also be integrated at different scales, levels and times. Decision makers must consider how land use decisions will influence other planning tools such as financial plans, capital works budgets, programming and initiatives, watershed management plans, climate change action plans and vice versa. Such integration helps to ensure that the resources for implementation are available and that potential barriers are recognized and accounted for.

Public participation — decisions about the use of land affects the way people live, work and engage in recreational activities and will have long-term implications that will be felt by future generations. As a result, the public has an interest in what decisions are made and for what reasons. Good planning processes provide sufficient opportunities for public consultation that are broad and inclusive. Bringing diverse interests into the planning process is essential to building consensus and making the process more meaningful.

It is in the Provincial interest to foster a culture of land use planning throughout Manitoba that is consistent with these principles and with the PLUPs.

SCOPE AND APPLICATION

The legislative authority for the establishment of PLUPs comes from subsection 4(1) of The Planning Act, which provides that the Lieutenant Governor in Council may, by regulation, establish provincial land use policies to guide sustainable land use and development in the province.

The PLUPs represent the provincial interest in land, resources and sustainable development. They provide policy direction for a comprehensive, integrated and coordinated approach to land use planning that emphasizes the importance the Province places on regular development plan reviews and updating planning policies and land use designations, rather than planning largely through ongoing incremental plan amendments.

The PLUPs apply to all land that is subject to The Planning Act. The Province will also give the PLUPs full consideration when undertaking planning activities and making land-use decisions on Crown lands.

The PLUPs serve as a guide to planning authorities in preparing, reviewing and amending development plans. They are intended to give general guidance and ensure that provincial interests are addressed. A development plan or regional strategy must be generally consistent with the PLUPs.

The PLUPs by their nature are general and cannot account for all local situations, special circumstances and exceptions. In recognition of this variability it is intended that they be applied to reflect local needs, so long as provincial interests are not undermined. The PLUPs will be strictly applied in areas of the Province experiencing more growth or change, such as the capital region, and may be applied with more flexibility in areas experiencing limited growth or change, and where there is little potential for land use conflict.

Ultimately, a development plan is a policy document approved by both the Province and the local planning authority that reflects the essence of the PLUPs as they pertain to the circumstances of the planning area. As such, once a development plan has been adopted, it replaces the PLUPs until the development plan undergoes a periodic review or is amended.

The PLUPs are divided into nine policy areas, each focussed on a specific area of provincial interest that can be supported by land use planning. The policy areas provide the policy "content" to be addressed by developments plans, taking into account local circumstances. Each policy area includes

a statement of the provincial interest, which explains the provincial interest for a particular subject area and why and how land use planning and development is related to it — this outlines the intent of the PLUPs;

a statement of a goal or goals, which identify what the Province hopes to achieve in this subject area to support the intent; and

land use policies, which outline the general or specific actions that should be taken or measures put into effect to meet the goal and intent.

The PLUPs are to be read as a whole and the relevant policies are to be applied to the circumstance or consideration. While none of the policies have precedence over the others, those of Policy Area 1: General Development apply equally to all the other policy areas and should be read together with them. The PLUPs are to be interpreted so as not to derogate from treaty or aboriginal rights.

PART 3
PROVINCIAL LAND USE POLICIES

Policy Area 1:  General Development

Provincial Interest

Manitobans live in a rapidly changing environment. For example, more extreme weather events and departures from climate norms now represent a significant risk to Manitoba. Our communities, ecosystems and economy are vulnerable to the impacts of climate variability and shifts in bioclimate and land use decisions should recognize these risks and strive to reduce vulnerability of communities and make them more resilient.

It is important to the Province that Manitoba's communities are environmentally, socially and economically resilient. From a land use perspective, this means fostering planning and development practices that support climate change mitigation and adaptation, promote healthy and fiscally sustainable communities, encourage diversity and protect cultural integrity.

Every community has unique circumstances and will use different methods to achieve their goals. However, there are a number of planning and development practices that the Province wishes to have applied consistently because they are fundamental to the sustainable development of Manitoba and are rooted in sound land use planning principles.

The Province supports and promotes these practices to ensure that development is reflective of a community's long-term vision, is compatible and avoids land use conflicts, promotes health, minimizes economic risks to the public, anticipates future needs and cumulative impacts, ensures the sustainable use of land and resources, protects ecological integrity and maximizes public investments.

In addition to these practices, the Province encourages innovative and best practice approaches to land use and development to help address provincial commitments to climate change mitigation, sustainable development, energy efficiency, and accessibility. For example, green building technologies and tools can improve the energy and resource efficiency of our built form and reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of buildings.

These practices and innovative approaches are reflected in the following policies. These policies apply to all planning and development decisions.

1.1  Protecting People, Property and Investment

Goals

To avoid and mitigate risks to people, property and investments from hazards and nuisances.

To anticipate change and undertake the necessary planning and measures needed to adapt.

Policies

1.1.1 Planning and development decisions must direct development to areas that are suitable for the proposed use and where risk can be prevented or minimized. Factors to be taken into account when assessing risk include

a) hazards or activities in or nearby proposed development that have the potential to negatively impact development or health and safety;

b) accessibility of emergency services;

c) existing land uses in or nearby the proposed development that could be negatively impacted by development;

d) the potential for development to negatively impact the environment;

e) the vulnerabilities of development to the potential effects of climate change; and

f) any other issue noted in the local emergency plan.

1.1.2 Land that could be unsafe for development due to naturally occurring processes, such as flooding, erosion and bank instability, is not suitable for development. Such land should be left in its natural state or its use should be limited to low intensity uses.

1.1.3 Incompatible developments and developments that may pose dangers to health and safety or that may be offensive and disturbing to the reasonable use of property should be located so that the development or use

a) does not negatively affect existing developments or designated land uses; and

b) can operate or expand safely, without unreasonable limitations.

Examples of these types of developments and uses include major utility and transportation facilities, waste storage, handling or disposal sites and other land uses that can create detrimental impacts such as safety issues and noise and odour concerns.

Potential dangers and nuisances associated with these developments and uses must be considered and either prevented through appropriate land use planning, or suitably mitigated through measures such as the use of separation, natural or human-made barriers, operating techniques, building materials or design.

1.2  Ensuring Compatibility Between Land Uses

Goals

To minimize land use conflicts by ensuring land uses and development are compatible.

To ensure the development of non-resource-related uses  is efficient and orderly and occurs in the most strategic locations to maximize investments, without negatively impacting on resource-related uses .

Policies

1.2.1 Development must be compatible with its surroundings, with existing uses and with transportation systems.

1.2.2 The designation of land for non-resource-related uses  should not be wasteful of land.

1.2.3 The amount of land designated for non-resource-related uses  should be consistent with the demonstrated rate of change in the requirements for such land uses and must take into account

a) the community vision for the planning area; and

b) the existing designations of such lands within the region.

1.2.4 Subject to policies 1.2.5 and 1.2.6, non-resource-related uses  must be directed to existing urban centres or to other areas that have been designated for non-resource-related uses.

1.2.5 The following non-resource-related uses may be accommodated in areas outside urban centres, provided that the areas are both appropriate and designated for the use:

a) developments that are intended to primarily serve the farm community,

b) developments that pose a hazard or nuisance in an urban centre, or

c) developments that require a larger site area than is available or appropriate in an urban centre.

1.2.6  Rural residential and cottage development must be directed to land designated for that purpose.

1.2.7 Developments described in policies 1.2.5 and 1.2.6 must be directed

a) to areas where, due to a combination of a diversity of landscape features, the predominance of lower class land, a high degree of land fragmentation and the existence of a mixture of land uses, agriculture is not dominant; and

b) away from prime agricultural land, viable lower class land and existing agricultural operations whenever possible.

1.2.8 Development outside an urban centre  must be located in a manner that ensures adequate separation from the centre so as to not impede the centre's orderly expansion, based on the projected land needs of the urban centre over a long-term planning horizon.

1.3  Integrating Public Services

Goals

To maximize existing investments in public services.

To integrate public service  considerations into development decisions in order to ensure that public services  have the capacity to support the development.

Policies

1.3.1 The direction and pattern of development should support the strategic and economical provision of accessible public services  to meet current and projected needs. To achieve this, before being directed to areas without public services, development should be directed to areas where appropriate public services

a) exist, and in particular to those areas with excess service capacity and that have been identified for redevelopment or intensification, such as brownfield sites; or

b) are planned, budgeted for and can be introduced in a timely manner.

1.3.2 If feasible, public services  should be co-located in order to promote cost-effectiveness and facilitate service integration.

1.3.3 Development should be examined on a regional scale to identify possible opportunities for regional cooperation, economic and energy efficiencies and service-sharing.

1.3.4 In order to ensure that development does not result in unexpected or unreasonable costs to the public, consideration should be given to whether existing public services have the capacity to accommodate development. Where capacity is or is projected to be insufficient, consideration must be given to

a) anticipated short- and long-term costs of the public services necessary to accommodate additional development; and

b) the ways for ensuring that the public services are paid for in reasonable and appropriate manner, including ensuring that those who benefit most from the provision of new public services are predominately responsible for the costs.

1.4  Promoting Sustainable Development

Goal

To promote sustainable land use patterns and innovative development practices that minimize pollution, protect resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Policies

1.4.1 Innovative design concepts and development standards should be used and promoted to facilitate the following:

a) addressing the needs of persons with disabilities, by meeting standards for universal design;

b) conserving or maximizing efficiencies of natural resources, including energy and water;

c) minimizing contributions of harmful emissions, including greenhouse gases;

d) supporting the use of renewable and alternative energy sources;

e) minimizing soil nutrients being lost through strategies such as stormwater retention and treatment, and erosion control;

f) minimizing and mitigating conflicts between humans and wildlife;

g) preserving and working with the natural landscape features of the area;

h) incorporating green design practices

i) in new building construction and the rehabilitation of or conversion of existing buildings,

ii) when conserving heritage buildings, if feasible and if consistent with heritage conservation standards as outlined in the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada, and

iii) to minimize the amount of impervious surface whenever practicable by using natural engineering design methods and, if feasible, encouraging alternate surfacing options.

1.4.2 Public facilities, services and resources must be accessible to the public. To ensure this, existing and planned public facilities, services and resources must be identified and policies to accommodate public access must be prepared and included. Some public resources may require specific measures to ensure public access, such as creating a public shoreland reserve for a water body.

1.4.3 Open green spaces within or adjacent to settlement areas  should be identified and considered for outdoor recreation uses and wildlife habitat. Linkages between green spaces, in particular through the creation and protection of greenways, should be promoted.

Policy Area 2:  Settlement Areas

Provincial interest

Settlement has occurred in a variety of forms throughout Manitoba, including varying scales of urban, suburban, rural, cottage and recreational types of development. This settlement has also occurred in a range of sizes, from single lot subdivisions to small communities, to the city of Winnipeg.

Manitobans value such variety when it comes to choosing where they live. Some enjoy the access, convenience and services of larger urban centres, while some prefer the open spaces, large lots and farm characteristics of rural areas. Others favour qualities of both.

It is important to the Province that Manitobans have the ability to choose where they live based on their lifestyle preferences and that a variety of choice exists. However, it is equally important that individual choices, as they relate to new or expanding development, are sustainable, support Manitoba's commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and do not generate unnecessary costs to, or negative impacts on, the public or upon the natural or heritage resources of the area. It is recognized that not all communities have the capacity to be economically self-sufficient and may rely on public partnership to support their overall sustainable development.

The Province has developed land use policies that focus growth and development on existing settlements areas, in particular, urban centres. Strong urban centres are important to Manitoba's long-term prosperity, social and environmental well-being and economic competitiveness. They provide employment, a diversity of housing types and affordable recreation and social services in an environment which can be universally accessible and facilitate aging in place. Concentrating development in urban centres also optimizes existing infrastructure and positions communities to generate the economic activity necessary to sustain themselves into the future. Because of the significant investment already put into existing urban centres and because of their social and historical significance, it is important to the Province that they are strengthened, optimized and planned so as to be sustainable.

The Province has also developed land use policies to limit low density and scattered residential development in rural areas. Such development, on a cumulative basis, can create conflict with agricultural operations, limit the ability of a municipality to provide for an increasing level of services that meet regulatory standards, inhibit urban expansion or access to resources, increase reliance on the single-occupant vehicles and associated emission of greenhouse gases, and pose environmental and public health risks due to inadequate onsite water and wastewater infrastructure. The costs associated with these cumulative impacts are not limited to the individual; rather they are borne by the public and may lead to a pattern of land use that is not fiscally or environmentally sustainable over the long term.

2.1  Strategic And Planned Settlement

Goals

To encourage compact and clustered settlement patterns and foster a culture of sustainable growth management and financial accountability.

To promote healthy, vibrant and well-balanced communities.

Policies

2.1.1 The emphasis of future development and growth should be on existing settlement areas where investments have already been made. As a priority, growth should be directed to urban centres that have appropriate public services to accommodate future development and growth.

2.1.2 Growth and development within settlement areas should occur in a planned and contiguous manner that emphasizes compact form.

2.1.3 To enable the planned expansion of settlement areas, lands additional to those designated for the settlement area may be identified as areas for new growth. New growth areas must be located adjacent to compatible, existing development.

2.1.4  Intensification of and reinvestment in existing development should be considered and encouraged before expansion into new growth areas, in particular for urban centres.

2.2  Strong Urban Centres

Goals

To foster, maintain and enhance the strength and competitiveness of Manitoba's urban centres.

To maximize and sustain existing investments in urban centres and ensure future investment is strategic and limits public costs.

Policies

2.2.1 Planning for urban centres should provide for a variety of housing types, densities and affordability levels to accommodate a range of income levels, the ability to age in place and diverse market demands.

2.2.2  Intensification activities within urban centres should not result in the loss of green space and public amenities. Wherever possible, intensification activities should contribute to the inventory of green space and public amenities.

2.2.3 To maximize existing public investments, the downtown or central business district of an urban centre must be protected and enhanced by

a) directing commercial facilities, public offices, institutional facilities and large-scale indoor recreational facilities which serve the whole community to the downtown or central business district;

b) ensuring safe, visible and effective public access to the downtown or central business district and its public facilities by public transit, and by planned linkages of the street system, public walkways, bicycle paths, green spaces and waterfronts;

c) encouraging the preservation of heritage resources and significant structures that are within the downtown or central business district;

d) promoting the rehabilitation and re-use of existing buildings in the downtown or central business district, and encouraging the multiple use of buildings and mixing different housing options with other compatible uses; and

e) supporting the revitalization of older neighborhoods contiguous to the downtown or central business district.

2.2.4 For a large urban centre, commercial facilities or services may be permitted to be located outside its downtown or central business district, if it is demonstrated that the primary function of the facility or service is to serve

a) the travelling public, provided the facility or service is located on a corridor identified for the use or to a node that connects multiple modes of transportation; or

b) a distinct district or neighbourhood, provided such district or neighbourhood-level facilities or services are generally located in a cluster served by collector or arterial streets, and complements rather than duplicates or directly competes with the downtown or central business district.

2.2.5 Regional-scale commercial facilities may only be permitted within designated commercial areas that are identified as key nodes in the transportation system.

2.2.6 The expansion of an urban centre must be directed away from prime agricultural land, agricultural operations and other valuable resources or resource-related uses so that land is not prematurely taken out of production or its use prematurely inhibited. However, where factors such as servicing and land availability make urban expansion into these areas the best option, urban expansion may take precedence over other uses.

2.3  Sustainable Rural Development

Goals

To preserve the natural and rural character of rural Manitoba and reduce the amount of land consumed, fragmented and made unproductive for resource-related uses.

To reduce the potential for land use conflicts.

To ensure that rural residential and cottage developments are well planned and do not lead to a pattern of development that creates unreasonable costs for the public.

To anticipate the growing trend of cottage developments constructed as or converting to year-round, permanent residences, and ensure that year-round, permanent residences are treated as such.

Policies

2.3.1 New rural residential and cottage development must be designated and planned in a way that preserves the natural and rural character of the area and makes it distinct from development in urban centres. In order to ensure this, rural residential and cottage development should

a) be located and designed to preserve the agrarian or natural features of the area;

b) have lots larger than those found in urban centres, but not be so large as to be wasteful of land; and

c) generally, be required to rely on onsite water and wastewater infrastructure.

2.3.2 Areas designated for rural residential and cottage development must not interfere with the expansion of urban centres or with existing resource-related uses or the expansion of those uses.

2.3.3 When considering establishing a new or expanding an existing rural residential or cottage development, the cumulative impacts of the development must be assessed to demonstrate that the additional development will not

a) negatively impact on existing rural residential and cottage development;

b) create the requirement for urban-like services, such as commercial development, neighborhood-scale facilities and services or institutional facilities, to serve the development;

c) lead to the evolution of a new urban centre; or

d) detract from the natural and rural character that attracted development to the area.

Policy Area 3:  Agriculture

Provincial Interest

Farms, today, range in size from small to moderate to very large modern business operations. These operations generate income for rural families, put millions of dollars and thousands of jobs annually into the local and provincial economy, provide a safe and high-quality supply of affordable food and agricultural products, and contribute to the well-being of all Manitobans.

Agricultural land is a valuable and limited natural resource and is the foundation of all agricultural activities in Manitoba. Prime agricultural land and viable lower class land can be considered non-renewable, as once taken out of production, they are seldom returned to agriculture. Yet, prime agricultural land are necessary for Manitoba's annual crop production, while viable lower class land support forage and livestock production and grazing. Planning for the agricultural use of these lands and protecting them from conversion to non-farm use is vital to the future of Manitoba's agricultural sector.

Although only about 13% of the provincial land base has agricultural potential, it is this same portion of the land base that is often the most desirable for non-farm use. Agricultural lands face increasing pressure from residential and recreational development, but also from competing resource-related uses. The resulting fragmentation of the land base can make it difficult for producers to farm by increasing the potential for conflict between farm and non-farm uses and inflating the cost of farmland. The Province encourages local authorities to support the farming community by setting policies that reduce the fragmentation of the agricultural land base and protect the viability of agricultural operations. This will encourage long-term commitment and investment from producers and enable a strong future for the agricultural sector.

It is expected that rising fuel costs and climate change may place an increased demand on the production and protection of local food sources. Producing food for local consumption reduces food miles traveled, increases the nutritional content of the food, and ensures a more secure food source for Manitobans. The Province encourages local authorities to plan for agriculture by fostering an atmosphere conducive to agricultural production, specialization, diversification and value-added processing. This will contribute to the economic development of rural communities, reduce land use conflicts for agricultural operations and enhance the use of agricultural land for food and other agricultural production.

A competitive agricultural industry needs a healthy environment. Agricultural producers perform a multifunctional role as stewards of our resources and our cultural heritage. Land use policies that protect working agricultural landscapes can also facilitate general public benefits such as clean air and water, open space, wildlife habitat and reduced downstream flooding. The Province encourages a long-term stewardship approach to land management based on sustainable management practices.

3.1  Planning For Agriculture

Goals

To protect agricultural land for present and future food production and agricultural diversification opportunities.

To promote a strong agricultural sector by

planning for agriculture and providing a stable environment for producers;

protecting agricultural operations from encroachment by other land uses; and

maintaining the ability of a producer to efficiently manage, expand or diversify an operation.

To encourage environmentally sound agricultural production and development in order to ensure a sustainable agricultural industry over the long term.

Policies

3.1.1 Agricultural lands must be identified and appropriately designated for agricultural use. Agricultural lands include

a) land with existing agricultural operations;

b) prime agricultural land ; and

c)  viable lower class land that is suitable for different types of mixed farming enterprises, including crop production, forage production and livestock grazing, provided that agricultural use of the land is consistent with its natural limitations and does not contribute to negative environmental impacts, such as soil degradation.

3.1.2 Land designated for agricultural use must be protected for agricultural operations, and from encroachment by new non-agricultural development which might unduly interfere with the continued operation or future expansion of agricultural operations.

3.1.3 Except as permitted under policy 3.1.5, non-resource-related uses must not be permitted on land designated for agricultural use.

3.1.4 To minimize fragmentation or further fragmentation of land designated for agricultural use, such land must be maintained in a minimum parcel size of at least 80 acres (32 hectares) (generally).

3.1.5 Land designated for agricultural use may be subdivided into a smaller parcel than what is permitted under policy 3.1.4 in the following circumstances:

a) a specialized agricultural operation in which high value, lower-volume, intensively managed agricultural products are produced, such as an apiary, a nursery or a greenhouse, requires a smaller land holding;

b) in respect of an existing farmstead site,

i) the site is no longer required as part of an agricultural operation because the associated farmland has been acquired by another agricultural operation, or

ii) subdivision of the farmstead site is necessary to allow the agricultural producer to continue to reside in the existing farm residence upon retirement;

c) a single lot subdivision for residential purposes is required for an individual who significantly participates in the agricultural operation on an ongoing basis and derives an income from it;

d) a single lot subdivision is proposed for rural residential purposes, but only if the proposal is in a planning area that has experienced continuous population decline over the previous fifteen years;

e) a single lot subdivision is proposed for a commercial or industrial use that is intended to

i) provide services, machinery, equipment or goods specifically required by agricultural operations, or

ii) store or process products grown or raised by an agricultural operation,

but only if it is demonstrated that due to the nature or activity of the use it is essential that it be located in an agricultural area;

f) a single lot subdivision is proposed for a parcel of land that has been physically isolated by such things as a transportation route or a water course, but only if the parcel is of a size, shape or nature that makes farming physically impractical.

3.1.6 Only one subdivision per 80-acre title may be permitted for the circumstances described in clauses 3.1.5(a) to (d).

3.1.7 Non-agricultural parcels created in accordance with clauses 3.1.5(b) to (e)

a) must not be wasteful of agricultural land;

b) should, if possible, be directed away from prime agricultural land and existing livestock operations; and

c) if applicable, must be confined to the existing shelterbelt that forms part of a farmstead site.

3.1.8 The consolidation of existing smaller holdings of agricultural land into or with larger holdings of agricultural land is to be encouraged.

3.2  Planning For Sustainable Livestock Operations

Goals

To support the sustainability of the livestock sector by planning for livestock development in order to minimize potential land use conflicts and protect the viability of agricultural producers.

To provide clarity to agricultural producers, rural residents and governments on siting considerations.

Policies

3.2.1 In a livestock operation policy, the identification of the areas that are required to be identified under clause 42(2)(a) of The Planning Act must be determined and rationalized in accordance with the following factors:

a) the compatibility of livestock operations with existing land uses, settlement areas and provincial natural land ;

b) the appropriate proximity of a livestock operation to

i)  water bodies, such as lakes, rivers and wetlands, and

ii) areas of groundwater vulnerability;

c) an area's soil capability for agricultural production; and

d)  an area's risk of flooding.

The information used respecting groundwater vulnerability, flood risk and soil capability for dryland agricultural production must be the information identified by or acceptable to the province.

3.2.2 Mutual separation distances must be established between existing livestock operations and any new or proposed

a) settlement areas;

b) designated parks or recreational areas; or

c) residential dwellings not associated with the livestock operation.

The separation distances must not be inconsistent with the separation distances prescribed in Part 5 — Livestock Operations. 

3.2.3 New livestock operations should not be accommodated on land that has soils determined, by detailed soil survey acceptable to the province with a scale of 1:50,000 or better, to have an agricultural capability of Class 6, 7 or unimproved organic soils.

Policy Area 4:  Renewable Resources, Heritage & Recreation

Provincial interest

The Province has a public and stewardship interest in maintaining the sustainability of renewable resources, while ensuring a balance between conservation and development. Land use planning can support this interest by identifying renewable resource areas and protecting them from incompatible development, fragmentation and degradation, while at the same time, capturing the economic opportunities, environmental and social benefits and values they provide.

Heritage resources often support traditional lifestyles and provide opportunities for aesthetic enjoyment, recreational use, tourism, cultural and heritage appreciation, and sustainable development. In many cases, this land helps maintain life-supporting ecological processes, biological diversity and helps offset and abate the potential problems of soil erosion, pollution, species extinction and climate change. Economic benefits are also accrued from recreational use, as natural land attracts visitors into the area who may purchase a range of goods and services such as guiding, accommodation, food and beverages, souvenirs, transportation needs and other recreational activities. It is for these values and opportunities that the Province has an interest in the conservation, protection and development of significant heritage resources through sound land use planning.

Some heritage resources require extra protection due to their unique or representative characteristics, such as enduring features. The Province is committed to permanently protect a representative sample of each of the province's 18 natural regions and subregions thereby conserving the biodiversity of Manitoba. These protected areas may be, in whole or in part, a wildlife management area, provincial park, ecological reserve, provincial forest or other area of Crown land established by provincial legislation. Through memorandums of agreements, private lands owned by conservation agencies are also recognized as protected areas.

Conservation of critical and significant wildlife habitat on private lands is also encouraged, through the use of voluntary tools such as conservation agreements.

4.1  Protecting Natural Lands and Resources

Goals

To conserve heritage resources and protect them from damaging uses.

To permanently protect a representative sample of each of the Province's natural regions and subregions and conserve the biodiversity of Manitoba.

Policies

4.1.1 Provincial natural land and critical and significant wildlife habitat must be identified and protected from incompatible land uses and developments.

4.1.2 If the adverse impacts of development on provincial natural land and critical and significant wildlife habitat cannot be avoided, the impacts must be minimized and mitigated by using appropriate measures to preserve, create or restore the value of the land and habitat.

4.1.3 Provincial natural land and critical and significant wildlife habitat that have been degraded or damaged should also be identified and prioritized for rehabilitation, if rehabilitation is practicable.

4.1.4 The fragmentation of critical and significant wildlife habitats should be avoided whenever possible, and the establishment and protection of wildlife corridors is to be supported. Development that will result in fragmentation of critical and significant wildlife habitats must be minimized and suitably mitigated.

4.1.5 Voluntary actions to conserve critical and significant wildlife habitat on private land is to be encouraged and facilitated.

4.1.6 Heritage resources should be identified and protected from the adverse impacts of development. If adverse impacts are unavoidable, the impacts must be minimized and mitigated by using appropriate measures to preserve, create or restore the value of the heritage resources.

4.1.7 The conservation of heritage resources must be undertaken in a manner that is compatible with the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada, as published by Parks Canada.

4.1.8 Heritage resources that have been degraded or damaged should also be identified and prioritized for rehabilitation, if rehabilitation is practicable.

4.2  Maximizing Sustainable Resource Opportunities

Goals

To maintain the sustainability of renewable resources and protect biological and ecological diversity.

To facilitate the sustainable use of renewable resources in an environmentally sound manner.

To promote the compatible and sustainable development of natural lands and heritage resources to optimize ecological, heritage, cultural, health and economic benefits to communities and Manitobans.

Policies

4.2.1 Opportunities for the compatible, environmentally sound, sustainable development of heritage resources and lands and habitat identified under policies 4.1.1 and 4.1.5 should be facilitated, including using

a) historic structures and sites for residential and commercial uses, if appropriate;

b) heritage resources for appropriate education and tourism opportunities; and

c) lands and habitat to support ecotourism, such as wildlife viewing and wilderness canoeing.

4.2.2 Areas where sustainable forest management and harvesting is permitted or is the dominant land use should be identified. Sustainable forest management and harvesting should also be encouraged in areas designated for agriculture use, if the uses can be integrated without conflict.

4.2.3 Urban forests and green spaces should be enhanced or encouraged to be established wherever possible.

4.2.4 Areas identified as having the potential to support sustainable wildlife and forest use opportunities should be planned to be used for activities such as wildlife viewing, tourism, ecotourism, hunting, trapping, collecting, associated service industries and sustainable timber harvesting.

4.2.5 Degraded or damaged wildlife habitats with significant wildlife potential, and lands best suited for forest establishment, are to be identified and prioritized for rehabilitation, if rehabilitation is practicable.

4.2.6 Woodlots and shelterbelts should be encouraged on lands that are not critical and significant wildlife habitat, including land that

a) is marginal for agriculture use, generally Canada Land Inventory classes designation 6 and 7 for agriculture;

b) is susceptible to erosion ;

c) is suitable for wildlife or outdoor recreational uses;

d) is adjacent to highways, and the use as a woodlot or shelterbelt has the potential to increase public safety;

e) has been disturbed and requires reclamation and rehabilitation; or

f) consists of a road allowance that has been encroached by unauthorized development, if the woodlot or shelterbelt would reclaim the land from the unauthorized development.

4.3  Compatible Recreational Use

Goals

To manage the recreational use of resources, which are recognized as valued assets and an integral part of Manitoba.

To ensure that existing and future recreational use is appropriately planned and accessible to the public.

Policies

4.3.1 When planning for outdoor recreational uses, consideration must be given to

a) the suitability of the natural resources for outdoor recreational use, which is to be determined with reference to

i) the Canada Land Inventory recreational capability classification of the natural resource, and

ii) the carrying capacity of the natural resource on which the outdoor recreational use will rely;

b) the amount of land needed to accommodate the particular outdoor recreational use; and

c) measures that are required to be taken in order to minimize and mitigate any negative impacts on the natural environment, which may include restricting the location of buildings and limiting the density of development, the proximity of the development to shorelines and the clearing of land.

4.3.2 Significant outdoor recreational use areas must be identified and protected from incompatible uses.

4.3.3 The development of an outdoor recreational use must not detract from the natural and recreational character of the resources that it relies on, or exceed the carrying capacity of the resource.

4.3.4 When considering development in outdoor recreational use areas, adequate land to accommodate anticipated and arising recreational uses is to be provided and public access to the area and facilities within the area must be ensured.

4.3.5 Outdoor recreational uses that are located adjacent to provincial natural land or critical and significant wildlife habitat should be planned in a manner that is consistent with the management of those lands, and helps ensure the ecological integrity of those areas.

Policy Area 5:  Water

Provincial interest

Sufficient quantities of high-quality water are essential for the sustained economic and social development of Manitoba. It is a vital resource to communities and for supporting business, industry, recreation and cultural and heritage resources. Just as importantly, water and its aquatic ecosystems are critical to the environmental and ecological functions that sustain healthy communities. For these reasons, the Province is committed to encouraging land use and development that supports the sustainability of the water.

This policy area recognizes the value and importance of water to the Province and ensures that development maintains the integrity of water. While continuing to ensure that Manitoba's water is available to meet important needs, wise use of land and sustainable development practices will help to

protect quality and quantity of water bodies, surface water and groundwater;

protect important aquatic ecosystems;

ensure clean sources of drinking water;

reduce risk to people and property due to flooding; and

protect cultural and heritage resources.

To maintain the integrity of water, planning for future developments must take into consideration the entire watershed. Integrated watershed management plans, which are locally developed and approved by the Province in accordance with The Water Protection Act, address the sustainable development and management of water, land, and aquatic ecosystems through a review of the economic, social, and environmental issues within a watershed.

An integrated approach is also critical for mitigating and adapting to the effects of future climate change, such as increases in the severity and frequency of droughts or floods. With increasing water demand from a variety of users, more water sources nearing full allocation, and the risk of drought, water scarcity is a real threat. To reduce vulnerability to such a risk, communities need to develop strategies for prioritizing water allocation and implementing water conservation measures. Land use planning is a tool for implementing these strategies and measures and can help build a community's resiliency to risk and change.

5.1  Protecting Water

Goals

To ensure the protection of Manitoba's water and to ensure that the quality and quantity of our water and aquatic ecosystems are healthy and sustainable for future generations.

Policies

5.1.1 Water bodies, groundwater and riparian areas must be identified and protected from the risks associated with development. In particular, land uses, activities and developments that have a high risk of causing pollution, such as disposal fields, fuel tanks, waste disposal grounds, lagoons and chemical and fertilizer storage facilities, must be considered and prevented or suitably mitigated.

5.1.2 In order to ensure water quality is protected, development in or near water bodies or riparian areas must not be permitted if the development may result in

a) the contribution of nutrients, deleterious chemicals or materials to water bodies or a riparian area ;

b) an acceleration of erosion or bank instability;

c) the removal of natural vegetative cover; or

d) an impact on any in-stream flows needed to maintain a healthy aquatic ecosystem.

5.1.3 To ensure the protection, retention and, where required, rehabilitation of riparian areas, the following setbacks must be applied in respect of development:

a) a minimum setback of 15 metres upslope from the normal high water mark of

i) first and second order drains, and

ii) artificially created retention ponds;

b) a minimum setback of 30 metres upslope from the normal high water mark for all natural water bodies and waterways, including ephemeral streams;

c) a minimum setback greater than 30 metres upslope from water bodies and waterways that

i) are designated under an enactment,

ii) are socially, historically or culturally important, or

iii)  contain unique aquatic assemblages and species.

The natural vegetative cover must be retained or rehabilitated within the above setbacks.

5.1.4 Developments that create minor disturbances to the natural vegetative cover in riparian areas, such as docks, pathways and boathouses, may be permitted in those areas, provided that not more than 25% of the length of the lot's shoreline is affected.

5.1.5 Development must not result in alteration to permanent, semi-permanent or coastal wetlands by the consolidation of wetlands or by ditching, filling, pumping, subsurface drainage or other works or means, unless it is for the purpose of flood mitigation. Flood mitigation must maintain the natural boundaries of permanent, semi-permanent or coastal wetlands.

5.1.6 To protect water that supplies a drinking water system, appropriate land use planning or suitable mitigation measures must be implemented to ensure that development does not

a) contribute pathogenic organisms, deleterious chemicals or nutrients to a drinking water source; or

b) increase the turbidity of a drinking water source.

5.1.7 Land use planning should facilitate and promote the efficient and sustainable use of drinking water.

5.1.8 In planning for developments that require groundwater, consideration must be given to the impacts on aquifers, including

a) the long-term ability of the aquifers to provide groundwater for normal usage;

b) the degradation of the quality and quantity of groundwater within the aquifers;

c) the rate of recharge of the aquifers; and

d) the effects on the ecosystems that are reliant on groundwater discharge from the aquifers.

5.1.9 In areas where the drinking water supply is limited or overburdened, land use planning should be used to ensure that

a) domestic uses are given priority over other uses;

b) alternative sources of water are identified for uses that do not require drinking water; and

c) uses that consume a significant amount of drinking water are not to be accommodated.

5.2  Avoiding Flooding And Erosion

Goals

To promote land use patterns and development that minimize risks to people, property and water quality from hazards and nuisances related to flooding, erosion or bank instability.

Policies

5.2.1 Land subject to flooding, erosion and bank instability or that has been designated under the Designated Flood Area Regulation, Manitoba Regulation 59/2002, must be identified. Development of this land may be permitted only if the risks are eliminated or ways are identified to ensure that

a) no additional risk to life, health or safety is created as a result of development;

b) buildings and other things constructed, such as septic fields, are protected from the risks related to flooding, erosion and bank instability; and

c) water flow, velocities and flood levels will not be adversely altered, obstructed or increased as a result of development.

5.2.2 Appropriate flood protection and mitigation measures must include the following:

a) the identification of protection levels

i) for land subject to flooding, that maintain a minimum 0.67 metres (two feet) of freeboard at a flood level equalling the design flood, and

ii) for lands adjacent to lakes and large reservoirs, incorporate the effects of wind set-up and wave uprush;

b) requiring that public access roads to developments be maintained at the static water level — being the computed design water level with no allowance for uncertainties in computation or adjustments for wind, ice or debris jams — in areas of land subject to flooding, unless roads are designed and constructed in such a manner that they will not impede river flows and will maintain a minimum 0.67 metres (two feet) of freeboard at a flood level equalling the design flood;

c) in areas where the flooding and erosion risks cannot be readily defined, that the required set-back for permanent structures from water bodies be at least 10 times the height of the bank above the normal summer water level or 30 metres, whichever is greater, unless a geotechnical engineering investigation shows that the set-back may be altered without creating any additional risks;

d) requiring that development that may accelerate or promote erosion or bank instability and the removal of natural vegetation is minimized and is not permitted within a riparian area ;

e) requiring that natural vegetative cover be preserved within riparian areas to reduce erosion and maintain bank stability.

Policy Area 6:  Infrastructure

Provincial interest

Infrastructure refers to the physical elements needed to serve development, including transportation, water, wastewater and storm water systems. Appropriate infrastructure can contribute to the health, sustainability and competitiveness of Manitoba's communities by offering a higher standard of living and quality of life for those who live, work and play in those communities.

Because the costs of infrastructure are often paid through public investments, it is important that decisions about infrastructure be determined with full consideration of its impacts on future land uses, on existing infrastructure and development, and the capacity of the community to support that infrastructure.

Decisions about infrastructure should also consider the impacts of climate change. Due to its long life span, infrastructure built today may still be in place when changes in climate have created conditions that can make that same infrastructure vulnerable. For example, warmer temperatures have the potential to cause increased melting of permafrost that could reduce the length of winter road use. Decisions about where to locate new roads, pipes and other key infrastructure facilities need to consider potential vulnerabilities, and adaptation measures should be built into construction.

Through an integrated approach to land use and infrastructure planning, lifecycle costing and demand management practices, local authorities will be able to make decisions regarding the provision of infrastructure in the most economically, environmentally and socially sustainable way.

It is important to note that there are circumstances where local authorities have a limited capacity to fulfil the infrastructure needs of their communities, such as resource-based, and aboriginal and northern communities. In such instances, it is important that other levels of government become a partner in the provision of infrastructure and ensuring its sustainability.

6.1  Strategic and Sustainable Infrastructure Investment

Goals

To avoid unnecessary expansion or development of new infrastructure and to ensure that investments in infrastructure can be sustained.

To integrate land use and infrastructure planning and ensure that the full environmental, social and economic costs of infrastructure are incorporated into the costs of development by encouraging a responsible and proactive approach to infrastructure.

Policies

6.1.1 Land use planning should be coordinated with municipal financial and capital planning in order to provide an integrated decision framework for development and spending priorities within the planning area.

6.1.2 The provision of infrastructure should be planned and appropriate for the type, scale and location of both existing and potential development.

6.1.3 Infrastructure investments to support development should be strategic and sustainable. In order to ensure this, the infrastructure planning process should consider

a) the full costs of the infrastructure, on a lifecycle basis;

b) the financial resources needed to maintain the infrastructure in a manner and to a level that meets needs, regulatory requirements and accepted industry standards;

c) the cost-benefits of different infrastructure options;

d) public health and safety; and

e) the environmental impacts of different infrastructure options, such as greenhouse gas emissions.

6.2  Appropriate Water And Wastewater Facilities

Goals

To protect the environment by ensuring that wastewater is appropriately stored, treated and managed and does not deteriorate water quality in the Province.

To improve the quality of life and ensure the safety and health of residents by providing good quality drinking water at a high standard of service that is affordable and efficient.

Policies

6.2.1 Planning and development decisions must take into consideration water and wastewater infrastructure, and the need for water and wastewater services to be provided in a manner that

a) protects health and safety;

b) protects the environment from contaminants;

c) does not exceed the capacity of the water upon which the services rely; and

d) promotes water conservation and water use efficiency.

6.2.2 Planning and development decisions are to be coordinated with and reflect local wastewater management and drinking water service plans to ensure that

a) sustainable sources of drinking water are available;

b) appropriate wastewater management and drinking water services are provided as needs or standards change; and

c) consideration is given to the capacity of the wastewater management and drinking water systems needed to accommodate new development.

6.2.3 Before land is designated for development that requires municipal wastewater services, drinking water services or both, the planning authority must confirm, in a manner acceptable to the Province, that there is sufficient capacity in the relevant services to accommodate the new development.

If capacity is determined to be insufficient, local or intermunicipal means and solutions must be implemented to increase capacity, as required, before the land is designated for development.

6.2.4 Development reliant on onsite disposal fields for wastewater management should not be permitted in order to satisfy development pressures in areas where serviced development cannot be accommodated because of insufficient municipal wastewater services capacity.

6.2.5 Piped water and wastewater infrastructure is the preferred form of servicing for urban centres.

6.2.6 In settlement areas with a piped wastewater management system, appropriate intensification activities may be undertaken to optimize the cost-effectiveness of the service.

6.2.7 In settlement areas with piped water and wastewater infrastructure services,

a) new development must be connected to those services; and

b) existing development with onsite water and wastewater infrastructure must be connected to those services through a phased approach.

An exception to the requirement that development be connected to those services may be permitted if it is demonstrated that extending the services to the particular development is physically impracticable.

6.2.8 In planning for development that is not intended to be connected to piped wastewater management services and drinking water services,

a) to accommodate disposal fields, lot sizes for a development must be at least two acres, or otherwise be in accordance with the Onsite Wastewater Management Systems Regulation, Manitoba Regulation 83/2003; and

b) for land uses that can be anticipated to require drinking water, a drinking water source must be identified that can provide a sustainable, onsite supply of drinking water over the long term.

6.2.9 Extension of piped water and wastewater management services beyond the boundaries of a settlement area must occur in a planning context that takes into consideration the area, including the region or regions, that may be affected by the extension.

6.2.10 Piped municipal water and wastewater infrastructure is not permitted to be extended beyond the boundaries of an urban centre, except if the extension is necessary to

a) address health and safety or environmental concerns respecting existing development, and is not intended to permit the expansion of new development on the periphery of an existing urban centre ; or

b) service a new industrial or major institutional development in a rural location.

6.3  Managing Solid Waste Disposal

Goals

To protect the environment by planning for effective and sufficient solid waste disposal in the Province.

To ensure that solid waste facilities are appropriately located and do not negatively impact community well-being.

Policies

6.3.1 Before approving a new land use designation or development, confirmation is required that local or intermunicipal solid waste facilities have sufficient capacity to accommodate any additional waste that may be generated.

6.3.2 Subject to policy 1.3.2, solid waste facilities must be established, and sited in an ecologically sound and cost-effective manner, in order to meet present and future demands for waste disposal in the planning district.

Policy Area 7:  Transportation

Provincial interest

Transportation, including roads, rail, air and marine, is critical to Manitoba's sustainable development. By influencing where and how land is used and developed, transportation directly affects our economy, competitiveness and quality of life. As such, Manitoba's transportation system should be enhanced and protected so it can continue to move people and goods in an efficient, safe and environmentally responsible way.

Integration of land use and transportation planning will support development that is compatible with both local and provincial transportation networks. By integrating land use and transportation considerations in development decisions, planning authorities can anticipate and minimize the potential for conflicts and hazards. For example, certain land uses, depending on their type, size and operation, may have a negative impact on the function of a highway, cause unsafe conditions or accelerate the need for costly transportation upgrades. Similarly, many land uses can be negatively affected by their proximity to transportation facilities due to dust, noise or odour.

To ensure Manitoba's competitive strength in global markets, local land use decisions must support the efficiency of an interconnected and multimodal provincial transportation system that can effectively serve freight while continuing to meet mobility and tourism needs. This system must also serve new economic trends and resource developments, as well as address the transportation access and equity challenges faced by northern and remote communities.

Through development plans, planning authorities can also encourage certain development patterns, land use mixes and densities that promote transit, walking and cycling, thereby reducing the reliance on single-occupancy vehicles. Such planning supports Manitoba's Kyoto commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improves sustainability by providing a range of accessible transportation options that minimize negative impacts on the environment, stress on existing infrastructure and the cost of future infrastructure development.

7.1  Integrated Transportation System

Goals

To enhance the integration and connectivity of the transportation system, across and between modes, for people and for freight.

To increase connectivity between routes and linkages between land uses and developments.

Policies

7.1.1 In order to ensure that appropriate linkages across Manitoba's transportation system are established and maintained, planning and development decisions must be coordinated with local, regional and provincial transportation plans.

7.1.2 Corridors should be identified and encouraged if major utilities, trails and other transportation rights of way can share space.

7.1.3 To ensure that development and the transportation network are compatible and potential conflicts are minimized, development must be restricted in areas

a) where the negative impacts of being located in the vicinity of a major transportation facility, such as noise, dust or the hazardous nature of the goods associated with transportation facility, cannot be suitably mitigated; or

b) that are in the vicinity of airports and airfields, if development is incompatible with aircraft operations or the expansion of airport facilities.

7.2  Promoting Transit and Active Transportation

Goal

To foster land use patterns and development design that caters to public transit users, cyclists, pedestrians and the mobility challenged, and reduces reliance on the automobile and its associated greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution and congestion.

Policies

7.2.1 All modes of transportation, particularly more active and environmentally sustainable forms such as walking, cycling and public transit, are to be facilitated.

7.2.2 The following should be promoted to encourage more walkable, transit- supportive communities and reduce the reliance on automobiles:

a) increased densities and mixed land uses at appropriate locations;

b) linkages between public transit, streets, sidewalks, river corridors, pathways and green spaces to form an interconnected network;

c) abandoned transportation corridors being used for public transit and trails;

d) increased connectivity in the urban street system to provide more direct routes between destinations and to reduce walking times;

e) bicycle paths and walkways being incorporated in existing built-up areas and in the design of new developments;

f) the incorporation of transit-supportive measures in developments, and in particular affordable housing developments, including

i) locating transit stops within reasonable walking distances (200 m to 400 m) from residential, commercial and institutional areas,

ii) establishing safe and secure park-and-ride facilities at appropriate locations, and

iii) implementing transit priority measures to assist in the unrestricted flow of transit

vehicles and overall efficiency;

g) the concentration of high trip-generating uses and public spaces in or adjacent to existing or planned transit stations and stops.

7.3  Safe and Efficient Movement of Goods and People

Goals

To increase trade and tourism by promoting the efficient and fluid movement of freight and people.

To increase the safety and security of Manitoba's transportation system for motorized and non-motorized users.

To protect public investments in transportation by ensuring land use planning and decisions preserve the efficiency and safety of the transportation system.

Policies

7.3.1 Land use planning must consider the access needs and traffic and safety implications of development.

7.3.2 Development decisions must take into consideration the requirements of The Transportation Infrastructure Act that apply to direct access to trade and major tourism routes and the regional highway network. For the purposes of this policy, the trade and major tourism routes are as identified on the map in Appendix 3.

7.3.3 Strip development, or a development that contributes to the evolution of a row of lots, that fronts on and requires direct connection to a provincial highway must not be permitted. An exception may be considered on a regional highway route if development adjacent to the route has already occurred to the extent that this policy can no longer be fully applied. For the purpose of this policy, a regional highway route means the regional highway routes identified on the map in Appendix 3.

7.3.4 Development should be directed to areas that have an existing improved intersection in place or rely on an internal road system.

7.3.5 Development that may negatively affect plans for road widening or expansion must not be permitted unless provisions are made to accommodate future widening or expansion.

7.3.6 Expansion of existing development that is bordered on one side of a transportation corridor, such as a provincial highway, major road or rail line, should be kept to the developed side of the corridor so as not to jeopardize user safety and efficiency.

7.3.7 Proposed developments that may have a detrimental impact on the operation, safety, function or expansion of provincial highways, provincial winter roads, future seasonal corridors, ferry docking facilities and ports must not be permitted unless appropriate mitigative measures can be incorporated into the development.

7.3.8 Airports and intermodal facilities must be protected from incompatible land uses that may adversely impact their operation, endanger public safety or create a potential safety hazard.

7.3.9 New developments or land uses should be planned and designed so that new at-grade rail crossings are minimized.

7.3.10 Development that will generate truck traffic requiring heavier loading than is allowed on a provincial highway or local road must not be permitted unless provisions are made to ensure that appropriate load improvements for the highway or road are incorporated into any plans for the development.

M.R. 55/2019

Policy Area 8:  Mineral Resources

Provincial interest

Mineral resources are non-renewable resources that are indispensable in our daily lives; however, their contributions to our material well-being are often overlooked. Manitobans use minerals in many forms and combinations and incorporate them into a wide range of products. For example, the nickel, copper and zinc produced in Manitoba mines are essential in the manufacturing of products such as buses, airplanes and health care equipment. Mining is also a vital component of the economy. It provides significant employment opportunities and is the second leading primary resource sector after agriculture. Much of Manitoba's mineral product is exported and significantly contributes to the province's merchandising export.

Manitoba has ownership and authority of its mines and mineral rights, including royalties. Manitoba has a system of dual land tenure where surface rights and mineral rights can be separate and owned by different parties. As a result, potential for access, use and occupation conflicts exists. It is in the provincial interest to honour mineral access and development rights associated with mineral disposition and ensure that appropriate security of tenure is achieved.

Mineral exploration and development is an interim land use. Access to lands containing mineral potential is essential to ensure the availability of construction materials and other materials that contribute to Manitobans' economic and social well-being.

Manitoba's aggregate and quarry minerals industry produce essential raw materials that are required to support private and public sector construction and infrastructure needs. This non-renewable resource has no cost-effective substitute for most end uses, and it is therefore in the public interest to protect high-quality aggregate and quarry mineral resources from conflicting surface land uses to minimize both construction and environmental costs. Quarry mineral extraction, particularly aggregate, is Manitoba's largest mining sector by land area disturbed and volume produced. Other types of quarry mineral extraction, such as sphagnum peat moss harvesting, possess unique land use and planning requirements and considerations.

8.1  Mineral Resource Planning

Goals

To ensure access to mineral, oil and natural gas resources and the development rights associated with mineral disposition by protecting economically valuable mineral, oil and natural gas resources from land uses that would preclude exploration, extraction and development.

To provide long-term security and access to high and medium potential mineral lands.

To ensure that quarry mineral extraction and harvesting occurs in an environmentally responsible manner.

Policies

8.1.1 Mineral, oil and natural gas resources, including lands containing high mineral potential, such as greenstone belts and the Thompson Nickel Belt, must be identified and protected from conflicting surface land uses that could interfere with access to the resources.

8.1.2 Only uses that are compatible with exploration, extraction and development of the resources should be accommodated on lands adjacent to land identified under policy 8.1.1. In addition, appropriate buffers must be identified and enforced to ensure that adjacent land uses do not unduly restrict exploration, extraction and development.

8.1.3 Without limiting policy 8.1.1, in accordance with the provincial designation of land respecting mineral, oil and natural gas resources, for an area of land designated as

a) "high", the dominant land use should be exploration and extraction; and

b) "medium", conflicting surface land uses may be accommodated only after provincial consultation and approval.

For the purposes of this policy, the Province will designate the following areas as "high" and "medium":

High:

Mineral management areas and limited use lands, as designated under The Mines and Minerals Act.

Areas that contain known deposits of valuable mineral, oil and natural gas resources.

Areas that have high potential for the discovery of deposits of valuable mineral, oil and natural gas resources.

Areas that contain valid mining claims or quarry mineral leases in good standing, if the existing surface land use allows for exploration and extraction.

Medium:

Areas that contain known deposits of mineral, oil and natural gas resources that are not of high-quality or have not had the full potential of the deposits proven.

Areas for which an exploration licence or quarry exploration permit have been issued.

8.1.4 Mineral, oil and natural gas exploration and development is to be recognized as an interim land use. As such, a non-conflicting land use may be permitted for the surface of areas designated by the province as "high" or "medium" before development and extraction begins.

8.1.5 The mineral tenure system and rights must be effectively integrated into land use and resource planning. Valid mineral access rights — including the right to enter, use and occupy the surface of land to prospect or explore for or develop, mine and produce minerals — must be honoured and appropriate security of tenure must be ensured.

8.1.6 Before establishing a land use that will permit a commercial sphagnum peat moss harvesting operation, consideration should be given to such things as access requirements and potential offsite drainage impacts.

8.1.7 If extraction of minerals, oil or natural gas ceases on land, the surface of which was prime agricultural land before the extraction began, the land must be rehabilitated to the same average soil quality for agriculture as is found on the surrounding lands.

Policy Area 9:  Capital Region

Provincial interest

Although it makes up only 1.2% of the Province's total land base, the capital region is home to over two thirds of Manitoba's population, with Winnipeg as its economic centre.

Winnipeg's status as the economic and population centre of Manitoba makes it especially significant to the Province and therefore it is appropriate that the provincial government, representing all Manitobans, pay attention to how Winnipeg and the surrounding municipalities that make up the capital region grow and develop. It is important to the Province that planning in the capital region supports sustainable and strategic development and takes advantage of the opportunities that make it competitive with other similar regions in Canada.

The capital region is a unique part of Manitoba as it relates to land use and development. The small size of the region relative to the scale and variety of land uses and interests within it increases the potential for land use incompatibility and conflict. For example, the capital region is located within the Red River Valley, which is home to some of the best agricultural soils in Canada, but also sees major flooding. For the capital region to develop in a smart and sustainable manner, land use planning must guide development in such a way that allows for growth, while protecting these valued lands and ensuring safety from flooding.

Additionally, many issues, such as transportation, drainage or water-related issues are intermunicipal in nature and development in one municipality will often impact on another. These situations can lead to conflict, but with cooperation can be avoided or minimized. For these reasons, the Province is interested in fostering a coordinated and regional approach to planning and development in the capital region.

9.1  Capital Region Planning

Goal

To develop a safe, healthy and prosperous capital region with a strong core city, through strengthened regional cooperation and partnerships.

Policies

9.1.1 Regional consistency should be promoted by encouraging the coordination and integration of development plan policies in the capital region.

9.1.2 To facilitate and promote the capital region's competitive edge over other Canadian centres, planning authorities in the capital region should collaborate on regional strategies for

a) sustainable economic development;

b) immigration;

c) growth management;

d) transportation network integration;

e) tourism, heritage and recreational development;

f) water quality and supply;

g) solid waste and wastewater management;

h) agricultural lands protection and diversification;

i) riparian area management; and

j) other regional strategies determined by consensus.

9.1.3 Land use planning in the capital region should be coordinated to protect and capitalize on the region's key economic advantages, including

a) the intermodal transportation facilities;

b) the Mid-Continent Trade Corridor for air, rail and truck transport industry development;

c) the Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport, its 24-hour operation status, and the clustering of industrial development in the vicinity of the airport;

d) the clustered biomedical facilities in Winnipeg; and

e) any other emerging sectors of economic growth identified in the capital region.

9.1.4 To ensure Manitoba's capital region is enhanced as an attractive place to live, planning authorities in the capital region should coordinate and cooperate on plans to provide the following within the capital region :

a) a range of housing and transportation options;

b) efficient, environmentally sound and sustainable public services ;

c) a diversity of recreational, cultural and educational amenities;

d) safe and healthy neighbourhoods;

e) interconnecting parks, open spaces, wildlife areas, heritage resources and waterfronts by pathways or trails suitable for bicycle and pedestrian use;

f) shoreline and riparian area management to protect water quality, enhance stability and prevent erosion.

9.1.5 Development plan policy for urban centres in the capital region should promote the development of sustainable communities that offer employment, shopping and entertainment opportunities for residents.

9.1.6 To encourage efficient and cost-effective provision of public services, communities in the capital region should collaborate on the potential for regional services and revenue sharing.

PART 4
DEVELOPMENT PLANS

Provincial Interest

Planning authorities are responsible for land use planning within their own planning areas. To help guide development and manage change, planning authorities adopt development plan by-laws.

Development plan by-laws set out the goals and policies for development within a planning area. They are the cornerstone for decision-making related to land use and development and must be kept current to reflect the goals and vision the community is trying to achieve. They also need to be respectful of aboriginal and treaty rights and any requirements for consultation.

While land use decisions are a local responsibility, the Province has a vested interest in how land and resources are planned and how development occurs across Manitoba. The PLUPs express this interest and development plan by-laws must be generally consistent with them.

"Generally consistent" means that development plan by-laws will embody the principles of sound land use planning as expressed in the PLUPs, and the goals, plans and policies contained in development plan by-laws will reflect the spirit and intent of the PLUPs. This is important because once a development plan by-law is adopted, the PLUPs no longer apply to the planning area until a plan is being amended or reviewed. As such, a development plan by-law is ultimately jointly approved and endorsed by both the planning authority and the Province.

To ensure that development plan by-laws are prepared consistently and of a high standard, the following requirements outline how plans should be prepared, amended and reviewed. In addition, the policy areas set out in the PLUPs provide the content that should be addressed by development plan by-laws, as they reflect the provincial interests.

It is also intended that development plan by-law policies be mutually supportive of the policies of other local or regional plans, including integrated watershed management plans, transportation plans, municipal emergency and business continuity plans and climate change action plans.

Development plans need to be respectful of Treaty and Aboriginal rights and any requirements for consultation.

The ultimate goal is to ensure that all planning authorities adopt comprehensive and integrated development plan by-laws within the overall provincial policy framework that supports the sustainable development of Manitoba and reflects the provincial interest in and local considerations for land, resources and development.

Long-term vision to guide process

1(1)   A planning authority must, when preparing its development plan, develop a long-term vision that supports the health and well-being of residents, the economy and environment of the planning area, and set goals, policies and time lines for achieving the vision.

1(2)   When reviewing or amending its development plan, a planning authority must ensure that

a) its long-term vision is reviewed and updated if necessary; and

b) amendments to the development plan are considered in the context of the long-term vision.

Coordination

2(1)   A planning authority must ensure that its development plan reflects and is coordinated with

a) other relevant plans, and that the policies within the various plans are mutually supportive; and

b) provincially approved plans for highway system upgrading or enhancement.

2(2)   For the purposes of subsection (1), and without limitation, a planning authority must consider the following when preparing its development plan:

a) the development plans for the areas within the same region as the planning authority, and in particular the development plans for the areas adjacent to the planning area ;

b) local environmental plans, including any applicable climate change action plans;

c) integrated watershed management plans and basin or aquifer plans that have been done for any part of the planning area ;

d) local wastewater management and drinking water service plans;

e) transportation plans;

f) access management plans that are based on the local road hierarchy and traffic forecasts.

2(3)   A planning authority must consult with the Public Schools Finance Board and local school divisions to ensure that its development plan and any subsequent secondary plans

a) contain appropriate policies to support the needs of the Finance Board and local school divisions; and

b) take into consideration the long-term land use and development impacts that the siting of public education facilities will have in the planning area.

Development plan requirements

3(1)   A development plan must identify and compare the location of resources and environmental features with the location of existing development, in order to identify the opportunities for growth and the limits to growth in the planning area.

3(2)   A development plan must identify a road hierarchy for local roads that determines the functions and significance of those roads and their place within the regional and provincial transportation system. For the purposes of this policy, the provincial transportation system means provincial trunk highways, provincial roads, seasonal roads, airports, rail lines and facilities and ferry docking facilities identified on the map in Appendix 3.

Studies to be done as part of development plan

4(1)   In preparing, amending or replacing a development plan, a planning authority must undertake the analysis and surveys of the planning area that are appropriate and necessary, including analysis and surveys of

a) the economic and fiscal capacity of the planning area to support and pay for development;

b) the agriculture, forestry, wildlife, heritage, natural lands and mineral resources in the planning area;

c) the capacity of resources, such as water, in the planning area to support development;

d) demographic and population projections;

e) the supply and demand for residential and other land uses;

f) the existing housing stock and projected of housing needs;

g) the traffic impacts of development and the options for addressing future transportation needs;

h) the existing and forecasted amounts and sources of greenhouse gas emissions;

i) the existing and future drinking water servicing and wastewater management needs of the planning area and options for addressing those needs;

j) the vulnerabilities of the planning area to climate change; and

k) any other matter related to the present or future physical, environmental, social, cultural or economic characteristics of the planning area that may be relevant to the development plan.

4(2)   The planning authority must undertake the required analysis and surveys with the assistance of qualified professionals in planning and other related disciplines and have the level of detail and complexity of the analyses and surveys prepared to a degree that corresponds to local circumstances and the matter under consideration.

Long-term land uses to be addressed

5(1)   A planning authority must ensure that its development plan provides for an appropriate mix of land uses, within the planning area's regional context, to meet the anticipated needs of the planning area.

5(2)   In order to ensure that the anticipated needs are met, the planning authority must

a) using recent and projected growth rates,

i) provide a sufficient supply of serviceable lots to accommodate demand for various land uses over the intermediate planning horizon, and

ii) designate land uses and identify directions for growth on the basis of a long-term planning horizon; and

b) take into consideration the regional supply and demand for land uses when designating land.

5(3)   As part of its planning for the intermediate and long-term planning horizons, a planning authority must identify the public services that are planned or required over those periods, and address how the expenses respecting the public services will be paid.

Inconsistency

6   A provision of a development plan by-law that is inconsistent with an enactment in force in the province is of no effect to the extent of the inconsistency.

PART 5
LIVESTOCK OPERATIONS

INTRODUCTORY PROVISIONS

Definitions

1(1)   The following definitions apply in this Part.

"Act" means The Planning Act. (« Loi »)

"animal unit" means the number of animals of a particular category of livestock that will excrete 73 kg of total nitrogen in a 12-month period. (« unité animale »)

"collection basin" means a structure

a) intended to collect runoff water contaminated with manure in an agricultural operation; and

b) constructed primarily from soil by excavating or forming dikes. (« bassin collecteur »)

"earthen manure storage facility" means a structure built primarily from soil, constructed by excavating or forming dikes, and used for storing or treating livestock manure, but does not include

a) a collection basin;

b) a field storage site; or

c) a temporary composting site for manure. (« installation de stockage de déjections en terre »)

"field storage site" means an area where solid livestock manure is stored in the open air, but does not include an earthen manure storage facility or a non-earthen manure storage facility. (« lieu de stockage dans un champ »)

"molehill" means a structure in which manure is mechanically forced through a pipe and becomes mounded. (« monticule »)

"non-earthen manure storage facility" means a non-earthen structure, molehill, tank or other non-earthen facility for storing or treating manure, but does not include a gutter or concrete pit used to contain liquid or semi-solid manure for less than 30 days for the purpose of moving the manure to a manure storage facility. (« installation de stockage de déjections non réalisée à l'aide de terre »)

"residence" includes a residence that is lawfully under construction and a residence for which a permit for construction has been issued. (« résidence »)

1(2)   Subject to section 2, in the Act and in this regulation, "category of livestock" means a category of livestock set out in Column 1 of the table in Appendix 2.

Determining total animal units in a livestock operation

2   For the purpose of the Act and this regulation, the total number of animal units in a livestock operation is the sum of the animal units, as determined under section 3, produced by each category of livestock in the operation.

Determining animal units

3(1)   For animals that are within a category of livestock set out in Column 1 of the table in Appendix 2, the number of animal units in the category is to be determined by dividing the number of animals in the category by the factor listed in Column 3 of the table for that category of livestock.

3(2)   For animals that are not within a category of livestock set out in Column 1 of the table in Appendix 2, the number of the animals that constitutes one animal unit is the number of animals of that category that will excrete 73 kg of total nitrogen in a 12-month period.

3(3)   For the purpose of subsection (2), the categories of livestock, and the amount of nitrogen that an animal within a category of livestock will excrete in a 12-month period, shall be determined by taking into consideration the guidelines or standards published or approved by the Manitoba Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives.

SITING AND SETBACK REQUIREMENTS

Siting standards

4(1)   In a zoning by-law, the minimum standards respecting siting of a new or expanded livestock operation must not be inconsistent with the minimum separation distances set out in the table in Appendix 1.

4(2)   The separation distances for siting a new or expanded livestock operation may only be determined by reference to the residences and designated areas that exist on the day the application to develop or expand the livestock operation is received by the applicable municipality.

4(3)   A residence, including a motor home or trailer, that is associated with the livestock operation shall not be taken into consideration when determining if a new or expanded livestock operation meets the minimum standards respecting siting set out in the table in Appendix 1 and the applicable zoning by-law.

4(4)   For certainty, a livestock operation is not subject to the siting standards prescribed in subsection (1) if, before the coming into force of this section,

a) the council of the municipality has approved it;

b) a valid development permit has been issued for it;

c) it was lawfully operating; or

d) it was lawfully being constructed.

Setback standards

5   In a zoning by-law, the minimum standards respecting setbacks for a new or expanded livestock operation must not be inconsistent with the minimum setback requirements from property lines and water features prescribed in the Livestock Manure and Mortalities Management Regulation, Manitoba Regulation 42/98.

RELATED LIVESTOCK OPERATIONS

Deemed single livestock operations

6   For the purpose of subclause 1.1(b)(ii) of the Act, two or more existing or proposed livestock operations are deemed to be a single livestock operation in the following circumstances:

1.One livestock operation is owned by a person and the other is owned by his or her spouse or common-law partner, if the person and his or her spouse or common-law partner live together in the same residence.

2.Two or more operations are owned by different corporations, if at least 50% of all shares carrying voting rights in each of the corporations are owned — directly or indirectly — by the same person or entity.

3.Two or more operations are owned by different partnerships, if the partnerships have at least one partner in common.

4.One operation is owned by a person and another is owned by

a) a corporation, if the person that owns the operation also owns — directly or indirectly — at least 50% of all shares carrying voting rights in the corporation; or

b) by a partnership, if the person that owns the operation is also a partner in the partnership.

5.One operation is owned by a corporation and another is owned by a partnership, if

a) the corporation is also a partner in the partnership, or

b) one of the partners, or the partnership itself, also owns — directly or indirectly — at least 50% of all shares carrying voting rights in the corporation.

APPENDIX 1

Minimum Separation Distances for Siting Livestock Operations

(Subsection 4(1) of Part 5)

Separation Distance in Metres (Feet) from a Residence Separation Distance in Metres (Feet) from a Designated Area
Size of Livestock Operation in Animal Units To Earthen Manure Storage Facility or Feedlot To Animal Confinement Facility or Non-earthen Manure Storage Facility To Earthen Manure Storage Facility or Feedlot To Animal Confinement Facility or Non-earthen Manure Storage Facility
10 – 100 200 (656) 100 (328) 800 (2,625) 530 (1,739)
101 – 200 300 (984) 150 (492) 1200 (3,937) 800 (2,625)
201 – 300 400 (1,312) 200 (656) 1600 (5,249) 1070 (3,511)
301 – 400 450 (1,476) 225 (738) 1800 (5,906) 1200 (3,937)
401 – 800 500 (1,640) 250 (820) 2000 (6,561) 1330 (4,364)
801 – 1,600 600 (1,968) 300 (984) 2400 (7,874) 1600 (5,249)
1,601 – 3,200 700 (2,297) 350 (1,148) 350 (1,148) 2800 (9,186) 2800 (9,186) 1870 (6,135) 1870 (6,135) 3,201
3,201 – 6,400 800 (2,625) 400 (1,312) 3200 (10,499) 2130 (6,988)
6,401 – 12,800 900 (2,953) 450 (1,476) 3600 (11,811) 2400 (7,874)
>12,800 1000 (3,281) 500 (1,640) 4000 (13,123) 2670 (8,760)
Definitions

The following definitions apply in this Schedule.

"animal confinement facility" means a barn or an outdoor area where livestock are confined by fences or other structures, and includes a seasonal feeding area but does not include a feedlot or a grazing area. (« installation de confinement pour animaux »)

"designated area" means an area designated for use as an urban centre, settlement centre, rural residential area, cottage area, park area or recreational area in the applicable development plan. (« zone désignée »)

"feedlot" means an outdoor area that is fenced to confine livestock solely for the purpose of growing or finishing, but does not include

a) a grazing area; or

b) a seasonal feeding area. (« parc d'engraissement »)

"grazing area" means an outdoor area where livestock are primarily sustained for part of the year by the direct consumption of feed grown on the area and manure does not accumulate such that mechanical removal or redistribution is required. (« pâturage »)

"seasonal feeding area" means an outdoor area, other than a feedlot or grazing area, where

a) livestock are given their supplemental or total feed requirements on a seasonal basis; and

b) because of its accumulation, manure must be removed from the area by mechanical means from time to time. (« aire d'alimentation saisonnière »)

APPENDIX 2

ANIMAL UNITS BY CATEGORY OF LIVESTOCK

(Subsections 1(2) and 3(1) of Part 5)

Column 1
Category of Livestock
Column 2
Animal Units Produced by One Livestock
Column 3
Factor to be used to Determine Animal Units
(Number of livestock to produce one animal unit)
Dairy

Milking Cows (including associated livestock)

2 0.5
Beef

Beef Cows (including associated livestock)

1.25 0.8

Backgrounder

0.5 2

Summer pasture / replacement heifers

0.625 1.6

Feeder Cattle

0.769 1.3
Hogs

Sows, farrow to finish

1.25 0.8

Sows, farrow to weanling

0.25 4

Sows, farrow to nursery

0.313 3.2

Weanlings

0.033 30

Growers / finishers

0.143 7

Boars (artificial insemination operations)

0.2 5
Chickens

Broilers

0.005 200

Roasters

0.01 100

Layers

0.0083 120

Pullets

0.0033 300

Broiler Breeder Pullets

0.0033 300

Broiler Breeder Hens

0.01 100
Turkeys

Broilers

0.01 100

Heavy Toms

0.02 50

Heavy Hens

0.01 100
Horses

Mares (including associated livestock)

1.333 0.75
Sheep

Ewes (including associated livestock)

0.2 5

Feeder Lambs

0.063 16
APPENDIX 3

MANITOBA TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

Manitoba transportation system

ANNEXE

PARTIE 1
DÉFINITIONS

autorité chargée de l'aménagement du territoire Commission d'un district d'aménagement du territoire ou conseil d'une municipalité qui est tenu d'adopter un plan de mise en valeur. (planning authority)

bien-fonds exposé aux inondations Bien-fonds qui, selon le cas :

a) est inondé par une crue équivalente ou inférieure à la crue nominale;

b) est connu pour ses inondations;

c) est inondé lorsque survient une crue précisée par la province dans une zone protégée par des ouvrages de lutte contre les inondations. (land subject to flooding)

bien-fonds viable de classe inférieure Bien-fonds, à l'exclusion d'une terre agricole à fort rendement, qui est occupé ou a déjà été occupé par des exploitations agricoles et qui pourrait l'être encore. (viable lower class land)

centre urbain Agglomération constituée en corporation, ville ou village. La présente définition vise notamment les zones habitées :

a) comptant au moins 25 résidences permanentes;

b) regroupant divers services commerciaux et services communautaires;

c) ayant un fondement historique ou un nom de lieu. (urban centre)

chalet Élément d'un ensemble résidentiel rural qui est destiné à une utilisation saisonnière ou temporaire. (cottage)

crue nominale Crue d'une étendue d'eau qui a une probabilité moyenne de se produire tous les cent ans. (design flood)

densification Mise en valeur d'une densité plus élevée que ce qui existe actuellement qui comprend le réaménagement de biens, l'agrandissement ou la conversion de bâtiments existants, la réutilisation de friches industrielles, la mise en valeur de biens sous-utilisés, l'édification sur terrain intercalaire et l'agencement d'usages des biens-fonds qui sont compatibles. (intensification)

eau Eau de surface et eau souterraine. (water)

ensemble résidentiel rural Ensemble de résidences unifamiliales non agricoles qui occupe une grande superficie et qui est situé à l'extérieur d'un centre urbain. (rural residential)

érosion À l'égard d'un bien-fonds, bien-fonds qui, au cours d'une période de 50 ans, peut devenir érodé ou instable sous l'action de l'eau qui se trouve dans une étendue d'eau adjacente. (erosion)

étendue d'eau Tout endroit où il y a de l'eau, qu'elle soit stagnante ou courante, qu'elle s'y trouve de façon naturelle ou artificielle et que son écoulement ou sa présence soit continuel, intermittent ou sporadique, comme pendant une inondation. La présente définition vise notamment les lacs, les rivières, les ruisseaux, les marécages et les terres humides ainsi que la glace qui recouvre leur surface. (water body)

exploitation agricole Activité agricole, horticole ou sylvicole réalisée dans le but de produire des produits agricoles à des fins commerciales. Sont assimilées aux exploitations agricoles :

a) la production de cultures, y compris les céréales, les oléagineux, le foin et le fourrage, et de cultures horticoles, y compris les légumes, les fruits, les champignons, le gazon, les arbres, les arbustes et les cultures en serre;

b) l'utilisation de biens-fonds pour l'élevage du bétail et le pâturage;

c) la production d'œufs, de lait et de miel;

d) l'élevage de gibier à poil, d'animaux à fourrure, de gibier à plumes, d'abeilles et de poissons;

e) la transformation nécessaire à la préparation d'un produit agricole en vue de sa distribution depuis la ferme;

f) l'utilisation de machines et de matériel agricoles, notamment pour le labourage ainsi que pour l'épandage d'engrais, de fumier, d'amendements du sol et de pesticides, que ce soit au sol ou par voie aérienne;

g) le stockage, l'utilisation ou l'élimination de déchets organiques à des fins agricoles. (agricultural operation)

ferme Partie du bien-fonds d'une exploitation agricole qui est habituellement entourée d'un brise-vent bien défini et qui comprend l'habitation du producteur agricole ainsi que les installations et bâtiments associés à l'exploitation agricole. (farmstead site)

friche industrielle Emplacement commercial ou industriel abandonné, vacant ou sous-utilisé qui est susceptible d'être contaminé. (brownfield sites)

habitat faunique essentiel Type d'habitat crucial pour assurer la taille de la population, la répartition ou la stabilité d'une espèce faunique dans une zone. Sont assimilés aux habitats fauniques essentiels :

a) les terres qui sont actuellement boisées ou qui se composent d'une combinaison appropriée de zones boisées et de clairières et qui appartiennent à la classe 1, 1W, 2, 2W, 3, 3W ou 4 des terres pour ongulés, selon l'Inventaire des terres du Canada;

b) les terres appartenant à la classe 1, 2, 3 ou 4 des terres humides, selon l'Inventaire des terres du Canada;

c) les zones de prairies indigènes continues ayant une superficie supérieure à 20 acres;

d) les habitats importants pour les espèces migratoires et pour le maintien d'une population faunique dans une région. (critical and significant wildlife habitat)

infrastructure d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées S'entend d'un réseau d'eau potable et d'un système de gestion des eaux usées. (water and wastewater infrastructure)

Inventaire des terres du Canada Cartes dressées par les gouvernements du Canada et du Manitoba qui indiquent le potentiel des terres pour l'agriculture, la foresterie, la faune et les loisirs. (Canada Land Inventory)

minéral Substance définie comme un minéral au sens de la Loi sur les mines et les minéraux et de ses règlements d'application. (mineral)

PPUB Politiques provinciales d'usage des biens-fonds. (PLUPs)

producteur agricole Personne qui produit et vend un produit agricole. (agricultural producer)

région de la capitale Municipalités mentionnées dans la Loi sur le Partenariat de la région de la capitale. (capital region)

réseau d'eau potable Système servant à pomper, emmagasiner, traiter et distribuer l'eau potable qui comprend les installations et les services assurant l'approvisionnement en eau potable. (drinking water system)

richesse du patrimoine S'entend des sites du patrimoine, des objets du patrimoine et des travaux et assemblages de travaux crées naturellement ou par l'activité humaine qui présentent une valeur archéologique, paléontologique, préhistorique, historique, culturelle, naturelle, scientifique ou esthétique et qui peuvent prendre la forme de sites, d'objets ou d'une combinaison des deux. (heritage resource)

services publics Les infrastructures, commodités et services fournis au public, notamment :

a) les infrastructures utilisées pour l'eau et les eaux usées, le transport, les déchets solides et d'autres services publics;

b) les ouvrages de régularisation des eaux, y compris les digues, les barrages, les drains de surface ou souterrains, les étendues d'eau naturelles améliorées, les canaux, les tunnels, les ponts, les buses, les trous de forage et les autres dispositifs servant au transport ou à la régularisation de l'eau et qui, selon le cas :

i) modifient ou peuvent modifier temporairement ou en permanence le cours de l'eau ou le niveau d'une étendue d'eau,

ii) changent ou peuvent changer l'emplacement ou la direction de l'écoulement de l'eau;

c) les parcs, les écoles et les installations de loisirs;

d) les services de santé, les services sociaux, les services de police, les services de protection contre les incendies ainsi que les autres services d'urgence. (public services)

système de gestion des eaux usées Système qui sert à recueillir, stocker, traiter, distribuer et éliminer les eaux usées et qui comprend les installations et les services associés à la gestion des eaux usées. (wastewater management system)

terre agricole à fort rendement S'entend :

a) d'une terre composée de sol minéral qui est classée dans la catégorie 1, 2 ou 3 en ce qui concerne le potentiel agricole des terres sèches;

b) de terrains constitués d'au moins un quart de section ou d'un lot riverain dont au moins 60 % est composé de terre classée dans la catégorie 1, 2 ou 3 en ce qui concerne le potentiel agricole des terres sèches;

c) d'une terre composée de sol organique qui est classée dans la catégorie O1, O2 ou O3 en ce qui concerne le potentiel agricole des terres sèches;

d) d'une terre classée dans la catégorie 1A, 1B, 2A ou 2B en ce qui concerne les possibilités d'irrigation. (prime agricultural land)

terre naturelle provinciale S'entend :

a) des parcs provinciaux, des réserves écologiques et des forêts provinciales;

b) des terres désignées comme réserves, zones de conservation spéciales ou zones de gestion de la faune en vertu de la Loi sur la conservation de la faune;

c) des terres, des plans d'eau douce et des zones marines désignées par un texte législatif à titre de zones protégées;

d) des terrains privés qui appartiennent à des organismes de conservation et qui sont reconnus comme des zones protégées dans le cadre d'une entente. (provincial natural land)

usage axé sur les ressources Usage, notamment l'agriculture, l'exploitation de carrières, l'exploitation forestière, la pêche, le piégeage, la chasse, les loisirs extérieurs ainsi que la production hydroélectrique et éolienne, qui dépend directement d'un bien-fonds ou de ressources. (resource-related use)

usage non axé sur les ressources Usage d'un bien-fonds ou mise en valeur, notamment les usages résidentiels, commerciaux, industriels ou récréatifs intérieurs, les terrains de jeu, les divertissements et les terrains de golf, dont l'emplacement ne dépend pas d'une ressource naturelle en particulier. (non-resource-related use)

zone d'aménagement du territoire Zone visée par un plan de mise en valeur. (planning area)

zone de roches vertes Zone de roches volcaniques et sédimentaires métamorphisées qui est située dans le bouclier précambrien et qui présente un potentiel élevé pour la découverte de métaux communs et d'or. (greenstone belt)

zone d'habitation S'entend des centres urbains et des zones désignées pour les ensembles résidentiels ruraux et les chalets. (settlement area)

zone riveraine Ensemble des terrains qui sont situés sur les rives ou à proximité d'une étendue d'eau et qui, en raison de l'influence de l'eau, peuvent supporter naturellement un écosystème différent de celui des autres terrains plus éloignés. (riparian area)

PARTIE 2
INTRODUCTION

POURQUOI ADOPTER DES POLITIQUES PROVINCIALES D'USAGE DES BIENS-FONDS

La planification est un processus auquel tout le monde a recours pour atteindre un objectif ou un but. Elle sert à réaliser ce qu'on veut, à se préparer à ce qui va probablement arriver ou à éviter des effets indésirables.

La planification consiste à prendre les devants au lieu d'attendre de voir ce qui va arriver pour ensuite réagir. Quand on choisit d'intervenir après coup, on prend parfois des décisions hâtives et coûteuses et on laisse passer des occasions stratégiques.

Dans le cadre de la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds, les décisions concernant l'usage et la mise en valeur des biens-fonds et des ressources sont prises en fonction d'une approche préventive. Le but est d'en venir à adopter une vision ou un but commun qui représente l'intérêt public et non pas de restreindre ou de réglementer la mise en valeur.

Pour assurer le développement durable du Manitoba, il faut que la planification porte sur plusieurs priorités stratégiques à la fois, comme les infrastructures durables, l'énergie propre, la santé et la sécurité publiques, l'atténuation des changements climatiques et les mesures d'adaptation connexes, la diversification de l'économie et la compétitivité, le logement abordable, la conservation des ressources et la protection de la qualité de l'eau.

La province reconnaît que l'usage des biens-fonds et des ressources a une incidence directe sur ces priorités. Par exemple, la façon dont on planifie et conçoit les collectivités influence le mode de vie des gens, leur consommation de ressources et la pollution qu'ils produisent, comme les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. C'est à cause de cette interdépendance que la province s'intéresse à la façon dont la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds et la mise en valeur se font au Manitoba.

L'intérêt de la province est exprimé dans les Politiques provinciales d'usage des biens-fonds (les « PPUB »). Les PPUB sont fondées sur les principes d'une planification judicieuse de l'usage des biens-fonds qui visent à orienter l'élaboration de plans de mise en valeur ainsi que les décisions continues concernant l'usage et la mise en valeur des biens-fonds de sorte qu'ils soutiennent les priorités stratégiques de la province et permettent d'éviter des effets indésirables. Les principes d'une planification judicieuse de l'usage des biens-fonds ressortent dans l'ensemble des PPUB et sont résumés ci-dessous.

Vision à long terme — Les décisions concernant l'usage des biens-fonds ont des conséquences à long terme. C'est pourquoi elles doivent être axées sur l'avenir et rattachées à une vision ou un plan global. Cela exige que les mises en valeur individuelles soient réalisées de façon coordonnée et stratégique, qu'elles aillent au-devant des besoins et qu'elles soutiennent les priorités communautaires. En l'absence d'une vision, les décisions sont prises de façon progressive et isolée et peuvent entraîner des incompatibilités imprévues et des effets négatifs cumulatifs.

Intérêt public — La planification de l'usage des biens-fonds vise généralement à protéger l'intérêt public. La mise en valeur des biens-fonds et des ressources comporte à la fois des coûts et des avantages. Les décisions à cet égard doivent assurer un juste équilibre entre les gains individuels et les coûts potentiels pour le public et tenir compte des profits à court terme par rapport aux coûts à long terme.

Compatibilité — Les usages des biens-fonds et les mises en valeur qui sont planifiés et conçus de sorte qu'ils soient compatibles avec le milieu permettront d'éliminer ou de réduire au minimum les risques d'incompatibilité et d'éviter les dangers pour la santé publique, la sécurité et l'environnement. Les usages des biens-fonds qui ne sont pas compatibles peuvent avoir des effets négatifs sur les gens, les biens, les investissements et l'environnement, par exemple :

entraîner des nuisances, comme du bruit, de la poussière et des odeurs;

obliger les exploitants privés et le public à engager des dépenses pour régler les questions d'ordre juridique et les plaintes;

mettre en danger la santé et la sécurité des personnes, causer des dommages matériels et fragiliser les investissements à cause des risques, tels que les inondations, et les dépenses publiques connexes pour l'évacuation et l'indemnisation;

occasionner des coûts supplémentaires associés à la mise en valeur qui sont engagés pour atténuer les incompatibilités.

Atténuation et adaptation — La capacité de prévoir les changements, d'atténuer leurs effets et de s'y adapter montre bien la résilience d'une collectivité. La gestion du changement, que celui-ci touche la population, la démographie, l'économie, l'écologie ou les normes climatiques, exige que les politiques et plans locaux soient souples et non pas immuables. Pour gérer le changement, il faut être en mesure, à l'échelle locale, de prévoir les problèmes et d'évaluer les décisions concernant l'usage et la mise en valeur des biens-fonds en fonction de la mesure dans laquelle elles permettent d'atténuer les effets négatifs du changement ou de s'y adapter.

Durabilité — Dans le contexte de l'usage des biens-fonds, le développement durable tient compte à la fois du développement économique, de la qualité de vie, de la santé publique et de la protection de l'environnement et n'oblige pas à faire des choix entre ces objectifs. C'est une approche qui reconnaît la valeur des fonctions importantes de l'écosystème, qui vise à les protéger ou à les intégrer aux mises en valeur de manière à produire les meilleurs résultats possible pour l'environnement bâti et l'environnement naturel, dans l'immédiat comme pour l'avenir.

Optimisation et efficacité — L'utilisation optimale et efficace des biens-fonds, des ressources et des investissements publics existants, notamment les infrastructures, peut réduire les coûts pour le public, promouvoir l'innovation et la compétitivité et aider à conserver des ressources précieuses. Une mise en valeur consciencieuse et stratégique des biens-fonds peut contribuer à améliorer la capacité financière, la qualité de vie et les services offerts au public.

Approche globale — Les décisions, politiques et programmes liés à l'usage des biens-fonds ont une incidence sur divers intérêts en plus d'être influencés par eux. La planification doit tenir compte des liens qui existent entre l'usage des biens-fonds et des aspects tels que le transport, le logement, les services sociaux et les différences culturelles. Une approche globale qui prend en compte divers aspects peut permettre de régler de nombreux problèmes sans en négliger ni en créer de nouveaux.

Intégration — Les décisions, politiques et programmes liés à l'usage des biens-fonds doivent également être intégrés à différents échelons, niveaux et moments. Les décideurs doivent examiner l'influence que les décisions concernant l'usage des biens-fonds aura sur d'autres outils de planification tels que les plans financiers, les budgets d'immobilisations, les programmes et initiatives, les plans de gestion des bassins hydrographiques, les plans d'action concernant les changements climatiques et vice versa. L'intégration aide à faire en sorte que les ressources nécessaires à la mise en œuvre soient accessibles et que les obstacles potentiels soient définis et pris en compte.

Participation du public — Les décisions concernant l'usage des biens-fonds influent sur la façon dont les gens vivent, travaillent et participent à des activités récréatives et elles auront des répercussions à long terme sur les générations à venir. Par conséquent, le public est concerné par les décisions qui sont prises et les motifs de ces décisions. Un bon processus de planification prévoit des occasions suffisantes de tenir de vastes consultations publiques qui sont inclusives. Il est essentiel de consulter les différentes parties concernées dans le processus de planification pour arriver à un consensus et obtenir de meilleurs résultats.

La province a tout intérêt à promouvoir dans l'ensemble du Manitoba une culture de planification de l'usage des biens-fonds conforme à ces principes et aux PPUB.

PORTÉE ET APPLICATION

L'autorisation législative concernant l'établissement des PPUB est prévue au paragraphe 4(1) de la Loi sur l'aménagement du territoire, qui édicte que le lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil peut, par règlement, établir des politiques provinciales d'usage des biens-fonds pour orienter un usage et une mise en valeur durables des biens-fonds dans la province.

Les PPUB représentent les intérêts de la province en matière de biens-fonds, de ressources et de développement durable. Elles fournissent une orientation stratégique pour l'adoption d'une approche globale, intégrée et coordonnée concernant la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds qui fait ressortir l'importance qu'accorde la province à l'examen régulier des plans de mise en valeur ainsi qu'à la mise à jour des politiques et des désignations relatives à l'usage des biens-fonds, plutôt que de miser principalement sur la modification progressive et continue des plans.

Les PPUB s'appliquent à tous les biens-fonds visés par la Loi sur l'aménagement du territoire. La province tiendra bien compte des PPUB lorsqu'elle entreprendra des activités de planification et prendra des décisions concernant l'usage des biens-fonds sur des terres domaniales.

Les PPUB servent à orienter les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire pour l'élaboration, l'examen et la modification des plans de mise en valeur. Elles visent à donner des conseils généraux et à faire en sorte que les intérêts de la province soient pris en compte. En général, les plans de mise en valeur et les stratégies régionales doivent être compatibles avec les PPUB.

De par leur nature, les PPUB sont générales et ne peuvent prévoir toutes les situations locales, les circonstances particulières ou les exceptions. Par conséquent, elles doivent être appliquées en fonction des besoins locaux, à condition que les intérêts de la province ne soient pas compromis. Les PPUB seront appliquées de façon rigoureuse dans les régions de la province qui connaissent une croissance ou des changements importants, comme celle de la capitale, et pourront être appliquées avec plus de souplesse dans les régions où la croissance et les changements sont limités et où il y a peu de risques d'incompatibilité entre les types d'usage des biens-fonds.

En fin de compte, un plan de mise en valeur est un document stratégique approuvé à la fois par la province et par l'autorité locale chargée de l'aménagement du territoire qui reflète l'essence des PPUB tout en tenant compte des particularités de la zone d'aménagement du territoire visée. Par conséquent, une fois adopté, le plan de mise en valeur remplace les PPUB jusqu'à ce qu'il fasse l'objet d'un examen périodique ou de modifications.

Les PPUB sont réparties dans neuf domaines de politique qui sont liés à des intérêts de la province pouvant être soutenus grâce à la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds. Les domaines de politique définissent le contenu des plans de mise en valeur, qui tiennent compte des caractéristiques locales. Chaque domaine de politique comprend :

un énoncé des intérêts de la province, qui explique les raisons pour lesquelles la province se préoccupe d'un aspect en particulier et les liens qui existent avec la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds et la mise en valeur et qui fait ressortir l'objet des PPUB;

un énoncé de l'objectif ou des objectifs, qui précise ce que la province espère accomplir en relation avec l'aspect en question pour remplir l'objet;

les politiques d'usage des biens-fonds, qui indiquent les actions générales ou particulières à mettre en œuvre ou les mesures à prendre pour atteindre les objectifs et remplir l'objet.

Les PPUB forment un tout, et les politiques utiles doivent être appliquées en fonction des circonstances et des particularités. Même si aucune politique n'a préséance sur les autres, celles liées au domaine de politique no 1 (la mise en valeur générale) s'appliquent de la même manière à tous les autres domaines de politique et doivent être lues dans leur ensemble. L'interprétation des PPUB ne doit pas porter atteinte aux droits issus des traités ni aux droits des peuples autochtones.

PARTIE 3
POLITIQUES PROVINCIALES D'USAGE DES BIENS-FONDS

Domaine de politique no 1 : la mise en valeur générale

Intérêts de la province

Le milieu dans lequel vivent les gens du Manitoba change rapidement. Par exemple, la fréquence accrue des phénomènes météorologiques extrêmes et l'élargissement des écarts par rapport aux normales climatologiques représentent désormais des risques importants pour le Manitoba. Nos collectivités, nos écosystèmes et notre économie sont vulnérables aux effets de la variabilité du climat et aux changements que subissent les microclimats, et les décisions concernant l'usage des biens-fonds doivent tenir compte de ces risques et viser à atténuer la vulnérabilité des collectivités et à accroître leur résilience.

Il est important pour la province que les collectivités du Manitoba fassent preuve de résilience sur les plans environnemental, social et économique. Du point de vue de l'usage des biens-fonds, cela signifie qu'il faut favoriser les pratiques de planification et de mise en valeur qui soutiennent l'atténuation des changements climatiques et les mesures d'adaptation connexes, qui font la promotion de collectivités en santé et financièrement viables, qui encouragent la diversité et qui protègent l'intégrité culturelle.

Chaque collectivité est unique et prend des moyens différents pour atteindre ses objectifs. Cependant, il y a plusieurs pratiques de planification et de mise en valeur que la province souhaite voir appliquer de façon uniforme parce qu'elles sont essentielles au développement durable du Manitoba et sont fondées sur d'excellents principes de planification de l'usage des biens-fonds.

La province soutient et encourage ces pratiques de sorte que la mise en valeur soit représentative de la vision à long terme d'une collectivité, soit compatible avec les usages des biens-fonds, favorise la santé, réduise au minimum les risques économiques pour le public, prévoie les besoins futurs et les effets cumulatifs, assure l'utilisation durable des biens-fonds et des ressources, protège l'intégrité écologique et maximise les investissements publics.

En plus de ces pratiques, la province encourage l'utilisation de méthodes innovatrices et fondées sur les pratiques exemplaires concernant l'usage des biens-fonds et la mise en valeur pour l'aider à remplir ses engagements en matière d'atténuation des changements climatiques, de développement durable, d'efficacité énergétique et d'accessibilité. Par exemple, les technologies et outils liés aux bâtiments écologiques peuvent améliorer l'efficacité énergétique et l'écœfficacité des formes bâties et réduire l'empreinte de gaz à effet de serre des bâtiments.

Ces pratiques et méthodes innovatrices ressortent dans les politiques ci-dessous, qui s'appliquent à toutes les décisions touchant la planification et la mise en valeur.

1.1  Protection des gens, des biens et des investissements

Objectifs

Éliminer ou atténuer les risques et les nuisances auxquels sont exposés les gens, les biens et les investissements.

Prévoir les changements et entreprendre la planification et les mesures nécessaires pour s'y adapter.

Politiques

1.1.1 Pour les décisions touchant la planification et la mise en valeur, il faut choisir un endroit convenable pour l'usage prévu où les risques peuvent être éliminés ou réduits au minimum. Les facteurs à prendre en considération pour l'évaluation des risques sont notamment :

a) les risques ou activités à l'endroit où se fera la mise en valeur prévue ou à proximité de celui-ci qui peuvent avoir des effets négatifs sur la mise en valeur ou la santé et la sécurité;

b) l'accessibilité des services d'urgence;

c) les usages existants des biens-fonds à l'endroit où se fera la mise en valeur ou à proximité de celui-ci sur lesquels la mise en valeur pourrait avoir des effets négatifs;

d) les effets négatifs potentiels de la mise en valeur sur l'environnement;

e) la vulnérabilité de la mise en valeur aux effets potentiels des changements climatiques;

f) toute autre question indiquée dans le plan d'urgence local.

1.1.2 Les biens-fonds qui pourraient constituer un danger en raison de processus naturels, comme des inondations, l'érosion et l'instabilité des berges, ne conviennent pas pour une mise en valeur. Ils doivent être laissés à leur état naturel ou leur utilisation doit se limiter à des usages de faible intensité.

1.1.3 Dans le cas d'une mise en valeur incompatible ou pouvant présenter des dangers pour la santé et la sécurité, être offensante ou perturber l'utilisation normale d'un bien, l'emplacement doit être choisi de sorte que la mise en valeur ou l'usage :

a) n'ait pas d'effets négatifs sur les mises en valeur existantes ou les usages de biens-fonds désignés;

b) puisse s'effectuer ou être élargi de façon sécuritaire, sans restrictions excessives.

Ces types de mises en valeur et d'usages comprennent les principales installations de services publics et de transport, les emplacements de stockage, de manutention ou d'élimination des déchets et d'autres usages des biens-fonds pouvant avoir des effets négatifs, comme créer des risques pour la sécurité ou causer du bruit et des odeurs.

Les nuisances et dangers potentiels associés à ces mises en valeur et usages doivent être pris en compte et éliminés grâce à une bonne planification de l'usage des biens-fonds ou suffisamment atténués à l'aide notamment de séparations, de barrières naturelles ou humaines, de techniques d'exploitation, de matériaux de construction ou de techniques de conception.

1.2  Comptabilité des usages des biens-fonds

Objectifs

Réduire au minimum les incompatibilités en veillant à ce que les mises en valeur et les usages des biens-fonds soient conciliables.

Voir à ce que la mise en valeur des usages non axés sur les ressources soit efficace et ordonnée et se fasse à des endroits stratégiques de manière à maximiser les investissements sans causer des effets négatifs sur les usages axés sur les ressources.

Politiques

1.2.1 La mise en valeur doit être compatible avec ce qui l'entoure ainsi qu'avec les usages existants et les réseaux de transport.

1.2.2 La désignation de biens-fonds pour des usages non axés sur les ressources  ne doit pas contribuer au gaspillage des biens-fonds.

1.2.3 La superficie des biens-fonds désignés pour des usages non axés sur les ressources doit être conforme au taux de variation confirmé dans les besoins liés à ce type d'usage et tenir compte de ce qui suit :

a) la vision communautaire concernant la zone d'aménagement du territoire;

b) les désignations existantes de ces biens-fonds dans la région.

1.2.4 Sous réserve des politiques 1.2.5 et 1.2.6, les usages non axés sur les ressources doivent se faire dans les centres urbains  existants ou d'autres zones qui ont été désignées pour ce type d'usages.

1.2.5 Les usages non axés sur les ressources ci-dessous peuvent se faire dans une zone située à l'extérieur d'un centre urbain, à condition que la zone en question soit convenable et ait été désignée pour ce type d'usage :

a) les mises en valeur qui visent principalement à servir les agriculteurs;

b) les mises en valeur qui constituent un risque ou une nuisance dans un centre urbain;

c) les mises en valeur qui exigent un emplacement plus grand que ceux qui sont disponibles ou convenables dans un centre urbain.

1.2.6 La mise en valeur d'ensembles résidentiels ruraux et de chalets doit se faire sur des biens-fonds désignés à cette fin.

1.2.7 Les mises en valeur visées aux politiques 1.2.5 et 1.2.6 doivent se faire :

a) dans des zones où, en raison d'une combinaison d'éléments paysagers divers, de la prédominance de biens-fonds de classe inférieure, d'un degré élevé de morcellement et de l' existence de différents usages de biens-fonds, l'agriculture n'est pas dominante;

b) loin des terres agricoles à fort rendement, des biens-fonds viables de classe inférieure et des exploitations agricoles existantes dans la mesure du possible.

1.2.8 Une mise en valeur effectuée à l'extérieur d'un centre urbain doit être suffisamment éloignée pour ne pas nuire à l'expansion régulière du centre urbain, d'après les prévisions des besoins à long terme de celui-ci en matière de biens-fonds.

1.3  Intégration des services publics

Objectifs

Maximiser les investissements actuels dans les services publics.

Tenir compte des services publics  pour la prise de décisions concernant la mise en valeur afin de s'assurer qu'ils ont une capacité suffisante.

Politiques

1.3.1 Les emplacements choisis pour la mise en valeur et la façon de procéder doivent contribuer à la prestation stratégique et économique de services publics  accessibles pour permettre de répondre aux besoins actuels et futurs. Par conséquent, plutôt que des endroits sans services publics, il faut d'abord choisir des zones où des services publics appropriés, selon le cas :

a) existent, et en particulier des zones qui ont une capacité excédentaire de fournir des services et qui ont été désignées en vue d'une nouvelle mise en valeur ou d'une densification, comme les friches industrielles;

b) sont prévus, figurent au budget et peuvent être rapidement mis en place.

1.3.2 Dans la mesure du possible, il faut faire en sorte que les services publics  soient situés dans les mêmes locaux afin d'assurer la rentabilité et de faciliter l'intégration des services.

1.3.3 Il faut examiner les mises en valeur à l'échelle régionale afin de relever les possibilités concernant la collaboration régionale, l'efficacité économique et énergétique et le partage de services.

1.3.4 Pour éviter qu'une mise en valeur entraîne des coûts imprévus ou excessifs pour le public, il faut déterminer si les services publics existants peuvent être utilisés. Si la capacité des services publics est insuffisante, il faut :

a) examiner les coûts prévus à court et à long terme des services publics nécessaires pour permettre la réalisation de mises en valeur supplémentaires;

b) trouver des moyens de faire en sorte que les services publics soient payés d'une manière raisonnable et appropriée et veiller à ce que les coûts soient principalement assumés par les personnes qui profiteront le plus des nouveaux services publics.

1.4  Promotion du développement durable

Objectif

Promouvoir des modes d'utilisation durable des biens-fonds et des pratiques de mise en valeur innovatrices qui réduisent la pollution au minimum, protègent les ressources et diminuent les émissions de gaz à effet de serre.

Politiques

1.4.1 Il faut employer et promouvoir des techniques de conception et des normes de mise en valeur innovatrices afin de :

a) répondre aux besoins des personnes handicapées en respectant les normes de conception universelle;

b) conserver les ressources naturelles, notamment l'énergie et l'eau, ou en maximiser l'efficacité;

c) réduire au minimum les effets des émissions nocives, comme celles des gaz à effet de serre;

d) encourager l'utilisation de sources d'énergie renouvelables ou de remplacement;

e) réduire au minimum la perte des éléments nutritifs du sol à l'aide de stratégies telles que la rétention et le traitement des eaux pluviales et la lutte contre l'érosion;

f) réduire au minimum ou atténuer les incompatibilités entre les êtres humains et la faune;

g) préserver les éléments du paysage naturel de la zone et en tirer parti;

h) appliquer les pratiques d'écoconception :

i) pour construire de nouveaux bâtiments et remettre en état ou transformer des bâtiments existants,

ii) pour assurer la conservation des édifices du patrimoine, si cela est possible et conforme aux normes de conservation du patrimoine figurant dans les Normes et lignes directrices pour la conservation des lieux patrimoniaux au Canada,

iii) pour réduire au minimum les surfaces étanches lorsque c'est possible en utilisant des méthodes de conception technique qui respectent la nature et en encourageant l'utilisation d'autres types de surfaces.

1.4.2 Le public doit avoir accès aux installations, ressources et services publics. Par conséquent, il faut déterminer quels sont les installations, ressources et services publics existants ou prévus et élaborer et inclure des politiques visant à les rendre accessibles au public. Dans certains cas, les ressources publiques peuvent exiger la prise de mesures spéciales pour assurer l'accès au public, comme la création d'une réserve riveraine publique pour une étendue d'eau.

1.4.3 Il faut déterminer quels sont les espaces verts situés à l'intérieur ou à proximité de zones d'habitation  et envisager de les utiliser pour des loisirs extérieurs ou à titre d'habitat faunique. L'établissement de liens entre les espaces verts, notamment par la création et la protection de couloirs de verdure, doit être encouragé.

Domaine de politique no 2 : les zones d'habitation

Intérêts de la province

Le peuplement s'est effectué de diverses manières un peu partout au Manitoba. On trouve notamment à différentes échelles des zones urbaines, suburbaines ou rurales, des aménagements de loisirs et des chalets. Voilà pourquoi il existe des zones d'habitation de tailles différentes, qu'il s'agisse de lotissements comprenant un seul lot, de petites collectivités ou de la ville de Winnipeg.

Les gens du Manitoba accordent de l'importance à cette diversité lorsque vient le temps de choisir un endroit où vivre. Il y en a qui sont attirés par l'accès, les commodités et les services qu'offrent les grands centres urbains, tandis que d'autres préfèrent les espaces ouverts, les grands lots et les caractéristiques agricoles des régions rurales. D'autres encore apprécient les qualités des deux milieux.

Il est important pour la province que les gens du Manitoba soient en mesure de choisir l'endroit où ils veulent vivre en fonction du mode de vie qu'ils préfèrent et qu'un éventail de possibilités s'offrent à eux. Cependant, il est tout aussi important que les choix individuels en matière d'habitation, qui nécessitent la mise en valeur de nouvelles zones ou des zones plus grandes, soient durable, soutiennent l'engagement du Manitoba à réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, n'entraînent pas de coûts inutiles pour le public et n'aient pas d'effets négatifs sur celui-ci ni sur les ressources naturelles ou les richesses du patrimoine de la zone visée. Il est reconnu que les collectivités n'ont pas toutes la capacité d'être autosuffisantes sur le plan économique et qu'elles ont parfois besoin de recourir à des partenariats publics pour assurer leur développement durable global.

La province a élaboré des politiques d'usage des biens-fonds qui visent à concentrer la croissance et le développement sur les zones d'habitation existantes et en particulier sur les centres urbains. Il est important d'avoir des centres urbains dynamiques pour assurer la prospérité, le bien-être social et environnemental et la compétitivité du Manitoba à long terme. Les centres urbains procurent des emplois et offrent divers types de logements, des activités de loisir abordables ainsi que des services sociaux dans un milieu qui peut être universellement accessible et qui favorise le vieillissement chez soi. En outre, le fait de concentrer la mise en valeur dans les centres urbains optimise l'utilisation des infrastructures existantes et permet aux collectivités de stimuler l'activité économique nécessaire pour subvenir à leurs besoins dans l'avenir. Compte tenu des investissements considérables déjà effectués dans les centres urbains existants et de l'importance de ceux-ci sur les plans social et historique, la province doit assurer leur durabilité en les renforçant et en les optimisant et en faisant une bonne planification.

Les politiques d'usage des biens-fonds visent également à limiter les ensembles résidentiels dispersés et ayant une faible densité dans les régions rurales. Ce type d'ensembles peut, à la longue, s'avérer incompatible avec les exploitations agricoles en plus de limiter la capacité d'une municipalité d'offrir des services accrus qui répondent aux normes réglementaires, d'entraver l'expansion urbaine ou l'accès aux ressources, d'accroître la dépendance à l'égard des véhicules à occupant unique et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre connexes et de présenter des risques pour l'environnement et la santé publique en raison de l'absence d'infrastructures d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées appropriées sur place. Les coûts associés à ces effets cumulatifs ne se limitent pas à une seule personne; ils sont assumés par l'ensemble du public et peuvent mener à des usages des biens-fonds qui ne sont pas durables sur les plans financier et environnemental.

2.1  Occupation stratégique et planifiée

Objectifs

Encourager la création de zones d'habitation compactes et regroupées et favoriser une culture de gestion durable de la croissance et de responsabilité financière.

Promouvoir des collectivités en santé, dynamiques et équilibrées.

Politiques

2.1.1 La croissance et la mise en valeur futures doivent être centrées sur les zones d'habitation existantes où des investissements ont déjà été faits. La croissance doit d'abord être axée sur les centres urbains dotés de services publics appropriés pour assurer la mise en valeur et la croissance dans l'avenir.

2.1.2 La croissance et la mise en valeur dans les zones d'habitation doivent se faire d'une manière planifiée de sorte que les zones soient contiguës et condensées.

2.1.3 Pour permettre l'expansion prévue d'une zone d'habitation, d'autres biens-fonds en plus de ceux désignés pour la zone d'habitation peuvent être désignés à titre de nouvelles zones de croissance. Ces zones doivent être adjacentes à une mise en valeur existante qui est compatible.

2.1.4 La densification d'une mise en valeur existante ou de nouveaux investissements dans celle-ci doivent être envisagés et encouragés avant la création de nouvelles zones de croissance, en particulier dans les centres urbains.

2.2  Centres urbains dynamiques

Objectifs

Favoriser, maintenir et accroître le dynamisme et la compétitivité des centres urbains du Manitoba.

Maximiser et maintenir les investissements existants dans les centres urbains et veiller à ce que les investissements futurs soient faits de façon stratégique et qu'ils limitent les coûts pour le public.

Politiques

2.2.1 Pour les centres urbains, il faut prévoir des types de logements, des densités et des niveaux de capacité financière différents pour tenir compte de toute une gamme de niveaux de revenu, de la capacité de vieillir chez soi et des diverses demandes du marché.

2.2.2 Les activités de densification dans les centres urbains ne doivent pas entraîner la perte d'espaces verts et de commodités pour le public. Dans la mesure du possible, ces activités doivent contribuer à accroître les espaces verts et les commodités.

2.2.3 Afin de maximiser les investissements publics existants, il faut protéger et améliorer le centre-ville des centres urbains à l'aide des mesures suivantes :

a) établir au centre-ville les bureaux publics, les établissements commerciaux, les installations institutionnelles et les installations récréatives intérieures de grande envergure qui sont destinés à servir l'ensemble de la collectivité;

b) fournir au public un accès sécuritaire, visible et efficace au centre-ville et à ses installations publiques en ayant recours au transport en commun et en prévoyant des liens entre le réseau de rues, les passerelles, les pistes cyclables, les espaces verts et les secteurs riverains;

c) encourager la préservation des richesses du patrimoine et des structures importantes qui se situent dans le centre-ville;

d) promouvoir la remise en état et la réutilisation des bâtiments existants dans le centre-ville et encourager leur utilisation à des fins multiples ainsi que l'agencement de différents types de logements avec d'autres usages compatibles;

e) soutenir la revitalisation des vieux quartiers qui sont contigus au centre-ville.

2.2.4 Pour les grands centres urbains, les installations ou services commerciaux peuvent être situés à l'extérieur du centre-ville s'il est démontré que leur principale fonction est de servir :

a) soit les voyageurs, à condition que les installations ou services soient situés dans un corridor désigné ou à un point de connexion pour plusieurs moyens de transport;

b) soit un quartier distinct, à condition que les installations ou services de quartier soient situés en général dans un regroupement desservi par des artères ou des voies de distribution et qu'ils complètent le centre-ville plutôt que de faire double emploi ou d'être en concurrence directe avec lui.

2.2.5 Les installations commerciales régionales ne sont autorisées qu'à l'intérieur des zones commerciales désignées qui sont considérées comme des points de connexion importants du réseau de transport.

2.2.6 L'expansion d'un centre urbain doit se faire loin des zones comprenant des terres agricoles à fort rendement, des exploitations agricoles et d'autres ressources précieuses ou usages axés sur les ressources pour éviter que l'exploitation des biens-fonds ne cesse ou ne soit entravée de façon prématurée. Cependant, si ces zones offrent la meilleure option possible en raison de facteurs tels que le raccordement aux services publics et la disponibilité des biens-fonds, l'expansion urbaine peut avoir préséance sur d'autres usages.

2.3  Développement rural durable

Objectifs

Préserver le caractère rural et naturel des régions rurales du Manitoba et réduire la superficie des biens-fonds utilisés ou fragmentés pour des usages axés sur les ressources ou rendus improductifs à cause de ces usages.

Réduire les risques d'usages incompatibles.

Voir à ce que les ensembles résidentiels ruraux et les chalets fassent l'objet d'une bonne planification et à ce que ces types de mises en valeur n'entraînent pas des coûts excessifs pour le public.

Prévoir l'augmentation des chalets construits à titre de résidences permanentes habitées toute l'année ou transformés en résidences permanentes et veiller à ce que ce type de résidence soit considéré comme tel.

Politiques

2.3.1 Il faut désigner et planifier les nouveaux ensembles résidentiels ruraux et chalets de manière à préserver le caractère rural et naturel de la zone visée et à différencier ces mises en valeur de celles réalisées dans les centres urbains. Par conséquent, les ensembles résidentiels ruraux et les chalets doivent :

a) être situés et conçus de sorte que les caractéristiques agraires ou naturelles de la zone soient préservées;

b) être aménagés sur des lots d'une plus grande superficie que ceux des centres urbains, sans que cela entraîne le gaspillage de biens-fonds;

c) disposer, de façon générale, d'infrastructures d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées sur place.

2.3.2 Les zones réservées aux ensembles résidentiels ruraux et aux chalets ne doivent pas nuire à l'expansion des centres urbains ni aux usages axés sur les ressources qui existent déjà ou à leur expansion.

2.3.3 Lorsque l'établissement ou l'expansion d'ensembles résidentiels ruraux ou de chalets est envisagé, il faut en évaluer les effets cumulatifs afin de fournir la preuve que les mises en valeur supplémentaires, selon le cas :

a) n'auront aucun effet négatif sur les ensembles résidentiels ruraux et les chalets existants;

b) ne nécessiteront pas de services de type urbain, comme des mises en valeur commerciales, des installations et services de quartier ou des installations institutionnelles;

c) ne mèneront pas à la création d'un nouveau centre urbain;

d) n'enlèveront rien au caractère naturel et rural de la zone qui est à l'origine de la mise en valeur.

Domaine de politique no 3: l'agriculture

Intérêts de la province

De nos jours, on trouve des exploitations agricoles de toutes les tailles, allant des PME aux grandes exploitations modernes. L'agriculture assure des revenus aux familles des régions rurales, procure chaque année des millions de dollars et des milliers d'emplois à l'économie locale et provinciale, fournit des produits alimentaires et agricoles salubres, abordables et de grande qualité et contribue au bien-être de toute la population du Manitoba.

Les terres agricoles constituent une ressource naturelle précieuse et limitée et elles sont à la base de toutes les activités agricoles au Manitoba. Les terres agricoles à fort rendement et les biens-fonds viables de classe inférieure peuvent être considérés comme non renouvelables puisque, une fois que leur exploitation a cessé, ils sont rarement réutilisés à des fins agricoles. Pourtant, les terres agricoles à fort rendement sont nécessaires à la production annuelle de cultures au Manitoba tandis que les biens-fonds viables de classe inférieure servent à la production de fourrage et de bétail et sont utilisés comme pâturage. Pour assurer l'avenir de l'agriculture au Manitoba, il est essentiel de planifier l'utilisation de ces terres à des fins agricoles et d'empêcher leur utilisation à d'autres fins.

Même s'il n'y a environ que 13 % des terres de la province qui possèdent un potentiel agricole, ce sont souvent ces terres qui sont le plus convoitées pour des utilisations non agricoles. Les terres agricoles sont de plus en plus menacées par les mises en valeur résidentielles ou récréatives ainsi que par des usages axés sur les ressources qui sont incompatibles. La fragmentation des terres qui en résulte peut rendre la tâche difficile aux producteurs puisqu'elle contribue à accroître les risques d'incompatibilité entre les diverses utilisations et à faire monter le prix des terres agricoles. La province encourage les administrations locales à soutenir les agriculteurs en établissant des politiques visant à réduire la fragmentation des terres agricoles et à préserver la viabilité des exploitations agricoles. Cela favorisera l'engagement et les investissements à long terme des producteurs et assurera un avenir prometteur au secteur agricole.

En raison de la hausse du prix du carburant et des changements climatiques, il faudra probablement accroître la production d'aliments locaux et protéger davantage les sources de nourriture locales. La production d'aliments pour le marché local permet de réduire la durée du transport des aliments et d'accroître leur valeur nutritive et procure une source de nourriture fiable aux gens du Manitoba. La province encourage les administrations locales à élaborer un plan pour l'agriculture en créant des conditions favorables pour la production, la spécialisation et la diversification agricoles ainsi que la transformation à valeur ajoutée. Cela contribuera au développement économique des collectivités rurales, réduira les usages incompatibles des biens-fonds pour les exploitations agricoles et permettra d'accroître l'utilisation des terres agricoles pour la production d'aliments et d'autres produits agricoles.

Pour être concurrentiel, le secteur agricole a besoin d'un environnement sain. Les producteurs agricoles jouent un rôle multifonctionnel en tant que gardiens de nos ressources et de notre patrimoine culturel. En protégeant les terres activement utilisées pour l'agriculture, les politiques d'usage des biens-fonds peuvent également procurer des avantages au grand public, comme de l'eau et de l'air purs, des espaces verts, des habitats fauniques et la réduction des inondations en aval. La province encourage l'adoption d'une approche d'intendance à long terme pour assurer la gestion des terres en fonction des pratiques de gestion durable.

3.1  Planification de l'usage des biens-fonds pour l'agriculture

Objectifs

Protéger les terres agricoles pour la production alimentaire et la diversification agricole actuelles et futures.

Dynamiser le secteur agricole en faisant ce qui suit :

planifier l'usage des biens-fonds pour l'agriculture et offrir un environnement stable aux producteurs;

protéger les exploitations agricoles contre l'empiètement d'autres usages des biens-fonds;

maintenir la capacité des producteurs de gérer efficacement, d'agrandir ou de diversifier leur exploitation.

Encourager l'adoption de méthodes de production et de mise en valeur qui ne portent pas atteinte à l'environnement pour assurer la durabilité du secteur agricole à long terme.

Politiques

3.1.1 Les terres agricoles doivent être identifiées et désignées comme il se doit en vue de leur utilisation à des fins agricoles. Sont assimilés aux terres agricoles :

a) les biens-fonds où se trouvent des exploitations agricoles existantes;

b) les terres agricoles à fort rendement;

c) les biens-fonds viables de classe inférieure qui conviennent à différents types d'activités agricoles mixtes, notamment la production de cultures, la production de fourrage et le pâturage du bétail, à condition que l'utilisation des biens-fonds à des fins agricoles respecte les caractéristiques naturelles de ceux-ci et n'ait pas d'effets négatifs sur l'environnement, comme la dégradation du sol.

3.1.2 Il faut protéger les terres désignées à des fins agricoles pour les exploitations agricoles et empêcher l'empiètement de nouvelles mises en valeur non agricoles qui pourraient nuire de façon excessive au maintien des activités ou à l'expansion future des exploitations agricoles.

3.1.3 Sous réserve de la politique 3.1.5, les usages non axés sur les ressources ne sont pas autorisés sur des terres désignées à des fins agricoles.

3.1.4 Afin de réduire au minimum le morcellement des terres désignées à des fins agricoles, il faut (en règle générale) que la superficie des parcelles soit toujours d'au moins 80 acres (32 hectares).

3.1.5 Une terre désignée à des fins agricoles peut être divisée en parcelles d'une superficie inférieure à celle prévue à la politique 3.1.4 dans les cas suivants :

a) une exploitation agricole spécialisée qui produit des produits agricoles à faible volume et de grande valeur qui sont gérés de façon intensive, notamment un rucher, une pépinière ou une serre, nécessite un bien foncier d'une petite superficie;

b) une ferme existante, selon le cas :

i) n'a plus besoin de faire partie de l'exploitation agricole parce que les terres agricoles qui y sont associées ont été achetées par une autre exploitation agricole,

ii) doit faire l'objet d'un lotissement afin que le producteur agricole puisse continuer d'habiter dans la résidence de la ferme au moment de sa retraite;

c) un lotissement visant à créer un seul lot à des fins résidentielles est nécessaire pour une personne qui participe de façon importante et continue à l'exploitation agricole et en tire un revenu;

d) un lotissement visant à créer un seul lot est proposé pour un ensemble résidentiel rural, à condition que la proposition vise une zone d'aménagement du territoire qui a subi une baisse de population continue depuis quinze ans;

e) un lotissement visant à créer un seul lot est proposé pour un usage commercial ou industriel devant servir soit à fournir des services, des machines, de l'équipement ou des marchandises dont ont expressément besoin les exploitations agricoles, soit à entreposer ou transformer des produits cultivés ou élevés dans une exploitation agricole, à condition qu'il soit prouvé que l'usage doit absolument se faire dans une zone agricole en raison de sa nature ou de l'activité qu'il comporte;

f) un lotissement visant à créer un seul lot est proposé pour une parcelle de terrain qui a été isolée au moyen notamment d'une route destinée au transport ou d'un cours d'eau, à condition que la superficie, la forme ou la nature de la parcelle rende les activités agricoles matériellement impossibles.

3.1.6 Le lotissement est limité à un seul titre par 80 acres pour les cas visés aux alinéas 3.1.5a) à d).

3.1.7 Les parcelles non agricoles créées conformément aux alinéas 3.1.5b) à e) :

a) ne doivent pas entraîner le gaspillage de terres agricoles;

b) doivent, dans la mesure du possible, être situées loin des terres agricoles à fort rendement ainsi que des exploitations de bétail existantes;

c) doivent, le cas échéant, être limitées par le brise-vent existant qui fait partie d'une ferme.

3.1.8 Le regroupement de petits biens fonciers existants constitués de terres agricoles avec des biens fonciers semblables de grande superficie est à encourager.

3.2  Planification pour des exploitations de bétail durables

Objectifs

Assurer la durabilité du secteur de l'élevage en planifiant la mise en valeur du bétail afin de réduire au minimum les risques d'incompatibilité entre les usages des biens-fonds et de protéger la viabilité des producteurs agricoles.

Clarifier les facteurs que les producteurs agricoles, les résidents des régions rurales et les gouvernements doivent prendre en considération pour le choix d'un emplacement.

Politiques

3.2.1 Dans une politique concernant les exploitations de bétail, la désignation de zones prévue à l'alinéa 42(2)a) de la Loi sur l'aménagement du territoire doit être effectuée et justifiée en fonction des facteurs qui suivent :

a) la compatibilité des exploitations de bétail avec les zones d'habitation, les terres naturelles provinciales et les usages existants des biens-fonds;

b) la distance convenable entre une exploitation de bétail et ce qui suit :

i) des étendues d'eau telles que des lacs, des rivières et des marécages,

ii) des zones d'eaux souterraines vulnérables;

c) le potentiel agricole des sols d'une zone;

d) les risques d'inondation d'une zone.

Les renseignements utilisés concernant la vulnérabilité des eaux souterraines, les risques d'inondation et le potentiel agricole des terres sèches doivent correspondre à ceux que détermine la province ou que celle-ci juge acceptables.

3.2.2 Il faut établir les distances qu'il doit y avoir entre les exploitations de bétail existantes et les zones d'habitation , les parcs ou les zones de loisirs désignés ainsi que les habitations non associées à une exploitation de bétail, qu'ils soient nouveaux ou projetés.

Ces distances doivent être conformes à celles prévues à la partie 5 — Exploitations de bétail. 

3.2.3 De nouvelles exploitations de bétail ne doivent pas être établies sur des biens-fonds comprenant des sols qui, selon une étude pédologique détaillée que la province juge acceptable et qui a été réalisée à une échelle de 1/50 000 ou une échelle plus précise, possèdent un potentiel agricole de classe 6 ou 7 ou sur des biens-fonds composés de sols organiques non améliorés.

Domaine de politique no 4 : les ressources renouvelables, le patrimoine et les loisirs

Intérêts de la province

Il est important pour la province, tant du point de vue de l'intérêt du public que de celui de l'intendance, d'assurer la durabilité des ressources renouvelables en établissant un juste équilibre entre la conservation et la mise en valeur. La planification de l'usage des biens-fonds est utile à cet égard puisqu'elle permet de désigner les zones de ressources renouvelables, de les protéger contre les mises en valeur incompatibles, le morcellement et la dégradation et de tirer parti des possibilités économiques et de la valeur sociale et environnementale qu'elles recèlent.

Bien souvent, les richesses du patrimoine soutiennent les modes de vie traditionnels et elles ont une valeur esthétique, récréative, touristique, culturelle et patrimoniale en plus de contribuer au développement durable. Dans bien des cas, les biens-fonds sur lesquels elles se trouvent contribuent à maintenir des processus écologiques nécessaires à la vie et la diversité biologique et aident à compenser et à atténuer les problèmes potentiels liés à l'érosion du sol, à la pollution, à la disparition d'espèces et aux changements climatiques. Par ailleurs, les utilisations récréatives ont des retombées économiques puisque les terres naturelles attirent dans la région des visiteurs qui sont susceptibles d'acheter un éventail de produits et de services (p. ex. services d'un guide, hébergement, aliments et boissons, souvenirs, transport et activités récréatives). C'est en raison de ces effets et retombées que la province souhaite conserver, protéger et mettre en valeur les importantes richesses du patrimoine grâce à une bonne planification de l'usage des biens-fonds.

Il y a des richesses du patrimoine qui exigent une protection accrue en raison de leurs caractéristiques uniques ou représentatives, telles que les éléments persistants. La province a à cœur de protéger en permanence un échantillon représentatif de chacune de ses 18 régions et sous-régions naturelles afin de préserver la biodiversité du Manitoba. Les zones protégées peuvent prendre diverses formes, notamment celle d'une zone de gestion de la faune, d'un parc provincial, d'une réserve écologique, d'une forêt provinciale ou d'une autre zone de terres domaniales établie par une loi provinciale. Grâce à des protocoles d'entente, les terrains privés qui appartiennent à des organismes de conservation sont également reconnus à titre de zones protégées.

La conservation des habitats fauniques essentiels situés sur des terrains privés est également encouragée au moyen d'outils à usage volontaire tels que les ententes en matière de conservation.

4.1  Protéger les terres et les ressources naturelles

Objectifs

Conserver les richesses du patrimoine et les protéger contre les usages dommageables.

Protéger en permanence un échantillon représentatif de chacune des régions et sous-régions naturelles de la province et préserver la biodiversité du Manitoba.

Politiques

4.1.1 Il faut désigner les terres naturelles provinciales et les habitats fauniques essentiels et les protéger contre les usages et les mises en valeur incompatibles.

4.1.2 S'il est impossible d'éliminer tous les effets néfastes d'une mise en valeur sur une terre naturelle provinciale et un habitat faunique essentiel, il faut les réduire au minimum ou les atténuer en prenant des mesures appropriées de manière à préserver la valeur de la terre et de l'habitat ou à recréer leur valeur initiale.

4.1.3 Les terres naturelles provinciales et les habitats fauniques essentiels qui ont été dégradés ou endommagés doivent également être désignés, et leur remise en état, si elle est possible, doit être considérée comme prioritaire.

4.1.4 Les habitats fauniques essentiels ne doivent pas être morcelés dans la mesure du possible, et l'établissement et la protection de corridors fauniques doivent être encouragés. Les mises en valeur ayant pour effet de morceler des habitats fauniques essentiels doivent être réduites au minimum et faire l'objet de mesures d'atténuation convenables.

4.1.5 Il faut encourager et faciliter les actions volontaires visant à conserver les habitats fauniques essentiels situés sur des terrains privés.

4.1.6 Les richesses du patrimoine doivent être désignées et protégées contre les effets néfastes d'une mise en valeur. S'il est impossible d'éliminer ces effets, il faut les réduire au minimum ou les atténuer en prenant des mesures appropriées de manière à préserver la valeur des richesses du patrimoine ou à recréer leur valeur initiale.

4.1.7 La conservation des richesses du patrimoine doit se faire conformément aux Normes et lignes directrices pour la conservation des lieux patrimoniaux au Canada, qui sont publiées par Parcs Canada.

4.1.8 Les richesses du patrimoine qui ont été dégradées ou endommagées doivent également être désignées, et leur remise en état, si elle est possible, doit être considérée comme prioritaire.

4.2  Exploiter au maximum les possibilités liées aux ressources durables

Objectifs

Assurer la durabilité des ressources renouvelables et préserver la diversité biologique et écologique.

Favoriser l'utilisation durable et écologique des ressources renouvelables.

Promouvoir la mise en valeur compatible et durable des terres naturelles et des richesses du patrimoine afin d'optimiser les avantages écologiques, patrimoniaux, culturels, économiques ou liés à la santé pour les collectivités et les gens du Manitoba.

Politiques

4.2.1 Il faut exploiter les possibilités d'assurer de façon compatible, écologique et durable la mise en valeur des richesses du patrimoine ainsi que des terres et des habitats visés aux politiques 4.1.1 et 4.1.5 en utilisant notamment :

a) des structures et lieux historiques à des fins résidentielles ou commerciales, s'il y a lieu;

b) des richesses du patrimoine pour la réalisation d'activités éducatives ou touristiques appropriées;

c) des terres et des habitats pour des activités d'écotourisme, comme l'observation de la faune et le canotage en milieu sauvage.

4.2.2 Les zones où la gestion et l'exploitation durables des forêts sont autorisées ou constituent le principal usage des biens-fonds doivent être désignées. De plus, il faut encourager la gestion et l'exploitation durables des forêts dans les zones désignées à des fins agricoles s'il est possible d'intégrer ces usages sans créer d'incompatibilités.

4.2.3 Il faut accroître les forêts et les espaces verts en milieu urbain ou encourager leur création dans la mesure du possible.

4.2.4 Les zones susceptibles de pouvoir soutenir une utilisation durable de la faune et des forêts doivent faire l'objet d'une planification pour qu'elles puissent servir à des activités telles que l'observation de la faune, le tourisme, l'écotourisme, la chasse, le piégeage, la cueillette, d'autres activités similaires et la récolte viable du bois.

4.2.5 Les habitats de la faune dégradés ou endommagés qui offrent un potentiel faunique important et les biens-fonds qui conviennent le mieux pour la création de forêts doivent être désignés, et leur remise en état, si elle est possible, doit être considérée comme prioritaire.

4.2.6 Il faut encourager l'utilisation à titre de lots boisés ou de brise-vents des biens-fonds qui ne sont pas des habitats fauniques essentiels, c'est-à-dire les biens-fonds qui, selon le cas :

a) ont un potentiel agricole faible, puisqu'ils appartiennent généralement à la classe 6 ou 7 selon l'Inventaire des terres du Canada;

b) sont exposés à l'érosion;

c) conviennent pour la faune ou des activités récréatives extérieures;

d) sont adjacents à des routes et dont l'utilisation à titre de lots boisés ou de brise-vents pourrait accroître la sécurité publique;

e) ont été perturbés et doivent être remis en état;

f) constituent une emprise sur laquelle empiète une mise en valeur non autorisée, si les lots boisés ou les brise-vents permettaient de récupérer les biens-fonds en question.

4.3  Activités récréatives compatibles

Objectifs

Gérer l'utilisation des ressources à des fins récréatives, ressources qui constituent des biens précieux et qui font partie intégrante du Manitoba.

Voir à ce que les activités récréatives actuelles et futures fassent l'objet d'une bonne planification et soient accessibles au public.

Politiques

4.3.1 La planification des activités récréatives extérieures doit se faire en fonction de ce qui suit :

a) la mesure dans laquelle une ressource naturelle se prête à des activités récréatives extérieures, qui est déterminée d'après :

i) la classe à laquelle appartient la ressource naturelle du point de vue de son potentiel récréatif selon l'Inventaire des terres du Canada,

ii) la capacité limite de la ressource naturelle dont dépendra l'activité récréative extérieure;

b) la superficie nécessaire pour une activité récréative extérieure donnée;

c) les mesures à prendre pour réduire au minimum ou atténuer les effets négatifs sur l'environnement naturel, comme restreindre l'emplacement des bâtiments et limiter la densité de la mise en valeur et sa proximité par rapport aux rives ainsi que le défrichage de biens-fonds.

4.3.2 Les zones qui sont beaucoup utilisées pour des activités récréatives extérieures doivent être désignées et protégées contre les usages incompatibles.

4.3.3 La mise en valeur d'une activité récréative extérieure ne doit pas atténuer les caractéristiques naturelles et récréatives des ressources dont elle dépend ni dépasser la capacité limite de ces ressources.

4.3.4 Lorsqu'une mise en valeur est envisagée dans une zone d'activités récréatives extérieures, il faut prévoir une superficie suffisante en fonction des activités récréatives prévues ou futures et veiller à ce que le public ait accès à la zone et aux installations qui s'y trouvent.

4.3.5 La planification des activités récréatives extérieures qui auront lieu à proximité d'une terre naturelle provinciale ou d'un habitat faunique essentiel doit se faire d'une manière qui est compatible avec la gestion des biens-fonds en question et qui contribue à l'intégrité écologique des zones visées.

Domaine de politique no 5 : l'eau

Intérêts de la province

Des quantités suffisantes d'eau d'excellente qualité sont indispensables au développement économique et social soutenu du Manitoba. L'eau est une ressource essentielle tant pour les collectivités que pour les entreprises, l'industrie, les loisirs, la culture et les richesses du patrimoine. De plus, l'eau et ses écosystèmes aquatiques sont cruciaux pour les fonctions environnementales et écologiques qui aident à garder les membres des collectivités en santé. C'est pourquoi la province s'est engagée à encourager les usages et les mises en valeur des biens-fonds qui contribuent à assurer la durabilité de l'eau.

Le présent domaine de politique s'appuie sur la reconnaissance de la valeur et de l'importance de l'eau pour la province et vise à faire en sorte que la mise en valeur ne compromette pas l'intégrité de l'eau. En plus de continuer d'assurer au Manitoba une quantité d'eau suffisante pour répondre à des besoins importants, l'utilisation judicieuse des biens-fonds et des pratiques de développement durable contribuera à :

préserver la qualité et le volume des étendues d'eau, de l'eau de surface et de l'eau souterraine;

protéger les écosystèmes aquatiques importants;

garantir des sources propres d'eau potable;

réduire les risques liés aux inondations pour les gens et les biens;

protéger les ressources culturelles et les richesses du patrimoine.

Afin de maintenir l'intégrité de l'eau, la planification des mises en valeur doit tenir compte de l'ensemble du bassin hydrographique. Des plans intégrés de gestion des bassins hydrographiques, qui sont élaborés à l'échelle locale et approuvés par la province conformément à la Loi sur la protection des eaux, déterminent le développement durable et la gestion de l'eau, des biens-fonds et des écosystèmes aquatiques d'après un examen des questions économiques, sociales et environnementales qui touchent un bassin hydrographique.

Une approche intégrée est essentielle pour atténuer les effets des changements climatiques futurs, comme l'augmentation de la gravité et de la fréquence des sécheresses et des inondations, et s'y adapter. Compte tenu de l'augmentation de la demande d'eau par divers utilisateurs, du nombre croissant de sources d'eau presque utilisées à pleine capacité et des risques de sécheresse, la rareté de l'eau constitue une véritable menace. Pour être moins vulnérables à ces risques, les collectivités doivent élaborer des stratégies visant à définir les priorités relatives à la distribution de l'eau et mettre en œuvre des mesures de conservation de l'eau. La planification de l'usage des biens-fonds est un outil qui facilite la mise en œuvre de ces stratégies et mesures et elle peut aider à accroître la capacité des collectivités de s'adapter aux risques et aux changements.

5.1  Protection de l'eau

Objectifs

Assurer la protection de l'eau au Manitoba et en préserver la qualité et la quantité de manière à garder notre eau et nos écosystèmes aquatiques sains et durables pour les générations futures.

Politiques

5.1.1 Les étendues d'eau, l'eau souterraine et les zones riveraines doivent être désignées et protégées contre les risques liés aux mises en valeur. Il faut notamment tenir compte des activités, des usages des biens-fonds et des mises en valeur qui présentent des risques de pollution élevés, comme les champs d'épuration, les réservoirs de carburant, les décharges, les lagunes et les installations de stockage de produits chimiques et d'engrais, et éliminer les risques ou les atténuer convenablement.

5.1.2 Afin de protéger la qualité de l'eau, il ne faut pas autoriser une mise en valeur dans une étendue d'eau ou une zone riveraine ou à proximité si la mise en valeur en question risque, selon le cas :

a) de contribuer à la présence d'éléments nutritifs ou de produits chimiques ou matières nuisibles dans l'étendue d'eau ou la zone riveraine;

b) d'accélérer l'érosion ou d'accentuer l'instabilité des berges;

c) de retirer une couverture végétale naturelle;

d) d'avoir une incidence sur le débit minimal nécessaire au maintien d'un écosystème aquatique sain.

5.1.3 Pour assurer la protection, le maintien et, s'il y a lieu, la remise en état de zones riveraines, les distances de retrait minimales qui suivent doivent être appliquées à l'égard d'une mise en valeur :

a) 15 mètres plus haut que la ligne normale des hautes eaux de ce qui suit :

i) les drains de premier et de deuxième ordre,

ii) les bassins de retenue artificiels;

b) 30 mètres plus haut que la ligne normale des hautes eaux pour toutes les étendues d'eau et cours d'eau naturels, y compris les cours d'eau saisonniers;

c) plus de 30 mètres plus haut qu'une étendue d'eau ou un cours d'eau qui, selon le cas :

i) est désigné en vertu d'un texte législatif;

ii) est important du point de vue social, historique ou culturel,

iii)  contient des assemblages et des espèces aquatiques uniques.

La couverture végétale naturelle doit être maintenue ou remise en état à l'intérieur des distances de retrait qui précèdent.

5.1.4 Les mises en valeur telles que les quais, les sentiers et les remises à bateaux qui causent des perturbations mineures à la couverture végétale naturelle dans des zones riveraines peuvent être autorisées dans ces zones, à condition que la portion du rivage du lot touchée ne dépasse pas 25 %.

5.1.5 Les mises en valeur ne doivent pas avoir pour effet de modifier des marécages permanents, semi-permanents ou côtiers au moyen de travaux de consolidation ou d'autres travaux, comme le creusage de fossés, le remplissage, le pompage ou le drainage souterrain, sauf si le but est de réduire les risques d'inondation. Les mesures visant à atténuer les risques d'inondation doivent respecter les limites naturelles des marécages permanents, semi- permanents ou côtiers.

5.1.6 Afin de protéger l'eau d'un réseau d'eau potable, il faut faire une bonne planification de l'usage des biens-fonds ou prendre des mesures d'atténuation appropriées pour éviter que la mise en valeur, selon le cas :

a) contribue à la présence d'organismes pathogènes, de produits chimiques nuisibles ou d'éléments nutritifs dans une source d'eau potable;

b) augmente la turbidité d'une source d'eau potable.

5.1.7 La planification de l'usage des biens-fonds doit faciliter et promouvoir l'utilisation efficace et durable de l'eau potable.

5.1.8 Dans le cadre de la planification de mises en valeur qui nécessitent de l'eau souterraine, il faut tenir compte des effets sur les formations aquifères, notamment :

a) la capacité à long terme des formations aquifères de fournir de l'eau souterraine pour une utilisation normale;

b) la diminution de la quantité d'eau souterraine contenue dans les formations aquifères et la dégradation de la qualité de cette eau;

c) l'alimentation spécifique des formations aquifères;

d) les effets sur les écosystèmes qui dépendent du débit d'eau souterraine des formations aquifères.

5.1.9 Dans les zones où les sources d'approvisionnement en eau potable sont limitées ou surexploitées, la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds doit servir à faire en sorte que :

a) les usages domestiques aient la priorité sur les autres usages;

b) d'autres sources d'eau soient identifiées pour les usages qui ne nécessitent pas de l'eau potable;

c) les usages qui entraînent une consommation importante d'eau potable ne soient pas permis.

5.2  Éviter les inondations et l'érosion

Objectif

Promouvoir les usages des biens-fonds et les mises en valeur qui comportent, pour la sécurité des gens et des biens et la qualité de l'eau, le moins de risques possible découlant des nuisances et des dangers associés aux inondations, à l'érosion ou à l'instabilité des berges.

Politiques

5.2.1 Les biens-fonds exposés aux inondations ou à l'érosion ou ayant des berges instables et les biens-fonds reconnus en vertu du Règlement sur les zones inondables reconnues, R.M. 59/2002, doivent être désignés. La mise en valeur de ces biens-fonds n'est autorisée que si les risques sont éliminés ou que des mesures sont prévues pour faire en sorte que :

a) la mise en valeur ne crée aucun risque supplémentaire pour la vie, la santé ou la sécurité;

b) les bâtiments et toute chose construite, notamment un champ d'épuration, soient protégés contre les risques associés aux inondations, à l'érosion ou à l'instabilité des berges;

c) la mise en valeur n'ait pas pour effet de modifier, gêner ou accroître le débit d'eau, la vitesse d'écoulement et le niveau des crues.

5.2.2 Les mesures appropriées de protection contre les inondations et d'atténuation de leurs effets comprennent nécessairement ce qui suit :

a) établir des niveaux de protection :

i) qui maintiennent une revanche d'au moins 0,67 mètre (deux pieds) à un niveau de crue équivalant à la crue nominale, dans le cas de biens-fonds exposés aux inondations,

ii) qui tiennent compte des effets de la dénivellation due au vent et du jet de rive, dans le cas de biens-fonds adjacents à un lac ou à un grand réservoir;

b) exiger que les chemins d'accès publics menant aux lieux des mises en valeur soient maintenus au niveau statique de l'eau — c'est-à-dire au niveau d'eau de référence établi sans marge d'erreur pour des facteurs tels que le vent, la glace ou les amoncellements de débris — dans les zones où les biens-fonds sont exposés aux inondations, à moins que les chemins ne soient conçus et construits de sorte qu'ils ne nuisent pas à la circulation de l'eau et permettent de maintenir une revanche d'au moins 0,67 mètre (deux pieds) à un niveau de crue équivalant à la crue nominale;

c) dans les zones où les risques d'inondation ou d'érosion ne peuvent être facilement déterminés, voir à ce que la distance de retrait des structures permanentes par rapport aux étendues d'eau soit d'au moins 10 fois la hauteur de la berge au-dessus du niveau normal de l'eau en été ou 30 mètres, selon ce qui est le plus élevé, à moins qu'une étude géotechnique n'indique qu'il est possible de réduire la distance de retrait sans accroître les risques;

d) réduire au minimum les mises en valeur susceptibles d'accélérer ou de favoriser l'érosion ou l'instabilité des berges et l'enlèvement de la végétation naturelle et les interdire dans les zones riveraines;

e) exiger que la couverture végétale naturelle soit préservée dans les zones riveraines de manière à réduire l'érosion et à assurer la stabilité des berges.

Domaine de politique no 6 : les infrastructures

Intérêts de la province

Le terme infrastructure désigne les éléments matériels, tels que les routes, les réseaux d'alimentation en eau, les réseaux d'égout et les réseaux de collecte des eaux pluviales, qui sont nécessaires à une mise en valeur. Des infrastructures convenables peuvent contribuer à la santé, à la durabilité et à la compétitivité des collectivités du Manitoba puisqu'elles ont pour effet de rehausser le niveau de vie et la qualité de vie des personnes qui vivent dans ces collectivités.

Étant donné que les infrastructures sont souvent financées à partir des fonds publics, les décisions à leur sujet doivent bien tenir compte des effets sur les futurs usages des biens-fonds et sur les infrastructures et les mises en valeur existantes ainsi que de la capacité de la collectivité de soutenir ces infrastructures.

En outre, les décisions concernant les infrastructures doivent tenir compte des répercussions des changements climatiques. Compte tenu de leur longue durée de vie, les infrastructures d'aujourd'hui seront peut-être encore en place lorsque des changements climatiques auront créé des conditions susceptibles de rendre ces mêmes infrastructures vulnérables. Par exemple, des températures plus douces peuvent accélérer la fonte du permagel, ce qui risque de réduire la durée d'utilisation des routes d'hiver. Les décisions relatives à l'emplacement des nouvelles routes, des canalisations et des autres infrastructures importantes doivent tenir compte des facteurs potentiels de vulnérabilités, et des mesures d'adaptation doivent être prévues durant la construction.

Grâce à une approche intégrée en matière d'usage des biens-fonds et de planification des infrastructures, à une évaluation des coûts du cycle de vie et à des pratiques de gestion de la demande, les administrations locales seront en mesure de prendre des décisions quant à la façon de fournir des infrastructures de la manière la plus durable possible sur les plans économique, écologique et social.

Il faut signaler que, dans certains cas, les administrations locales ont une capacité limitée de fournir les infrastructures don't ont besoin les collectivités, par exemple celles dépendant avant tout de l'exploitation des ressources et les collectivités autochtones ou du Nord. Il est alors important de former des partenariats avec les autres ordres de gouvernement pour se doter d'infrastructures et assurer leur durabilité.

6.1  Investissements stratégiques et durables dans les infrastructures

Objectifs

Éviter l'agrandissement d'infrastructures ou la mise en valeur de nouvelles infrastructures lorsque cela n'est pas nécessaire et assurer le maintien des investissements dans les infrastructures.

Intégrer la planification des infrastructures et de l'usage des biens-fonds et voir à ce que l'ensemble des coûts environnementaux, sociaux et économiques des infrastructures soient inclus dans les coûts des mises en valeur grâce à l'adoption d'une approche responsable et proactive à l'égard des infrastructures.

Politiques

6.1.1 Il faut coordonner la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds avec le processus de planification financière et de planification des immobilisations des municipalités afin de fournir un cadre décisionnel intégré permettant de définir les priorités concernant les mises en valeur et les dépenses dans une zone d'aménagement du territoire.

6.1.2 Les infrastructures doivent être planifiées et adaptées en fonction du type, de l'envergure et de l'emplacement des mises en valeur tant existantes que potentielles.

6.1.3 Les investissements dans les infrastructures qui ont pour but de soutenir les mises en valeur doivent être stratégiques et durables. Par conséquent, le processus de planification des infrastructures doit tenir compte de ce qui suit :

a) les coûts totaux des infrastructures, en fonction du cycle de vie;

b) les ressources financières nécessaires pour maintenir les infrastructures de manière à répondre aux besoins, aux exigences réglementaires ainsi qu'aux normes acceptées de l'industrie;

c) les coûts et avantages de différentes possibilités en matière d'infrastructures;

d) la santé et la sécurité du public;

e) les conséquences environnementales des différentes possibilités, comme les émissions de gaz à effet de serre.

6.2  Installations convenables pour l'eau et les eaux usées

Objectifs

Protéger l'environnement en faisant en sorte que les eaux usées soient stockées, traitées et gérées comme il se doit et ne compromettent pas la qualité de l'eau dans la province.

Améliorer la qualité de vie et assurer la sécurité et la santé des résidents en fournissant de façon abordable et efficace une eau potable de bonne qualité selon une norme de service élevée.

Politiques

6.2.1 Les décisions concernant la planification et la mise en valeur doivent tenir compte de l'infrastructure d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées ainsi que de la nécessité de fournir des services d'aqueduc et d'égout de manière à :

a) protéger la santé et la sécurité;

b) protéger l'environnement contre les contaminants;

c) ne pas dépasser la capacité de la source d'eau dont dépendent les services;

d) promouvoir la conservation et l'utilisation efficace de l'eau.

6.2.2 Les décisions concernant la planification et la mise en valeur doivent être coordonnées avec les plans locaux de gestion des eaux usées et d'approvisionnement en eau potable et en tenir compte de sorte que :

a) des sources durables d'eau potable soient disponibles;

b) des services appropriés de gestion des eaux usées et d'approvisionnement en eau potable soient fournis en fonction des besoins ou des changements dans les normes;

c) la capacité nécessaire pour qu'un système de gestion des eaux usées et un réseau d'eau potable puissent prendre en charge une nouvelle mise en valeur soit prise en compte.

6.2.3 Avant qu'un bien-fonds soit désigné en vue d'une mise en valeur nécessitant des services d'égout ou des services d'aqueduc municipaux, ou les deux, l'autorité chargée de l'aménagement du territoire doit confirmer, d'une manière que la province juge acceptable, que les services en question ont une capacité suffisante pour prendre en charge la nouvelle mise en valeur.

Si la capacité est jugée insuffisante, il faut mettre en œuvre des mesures et solutions locales ou intermunicipales afin d'accroître la capacité, au besoin, avant que le bien-fonds soit désigné en vue d'une mise en valeur.

6.2.4 Il ne faut pas autoriser les mises en valeur qui nécessitent l'aménagement d'un champ d'épuration sur place pour assurer la gestion des eaux usées aux endroits où il n'est pas possible de se raccorder au réseau d'égout municipal en raison de sa capacité insuffisante.

6.2.5 L'utilisation d'une infrastructure d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées sous forme de réseau constitue la méthode de viabilisation à privilégier pour les centres urbains.

6.2.6 Dans les zones d'habitation munies d'un système de gestion des eaux usées sous forme de réseau, des activités de densification appropriées peuvent être entreprises afin d'optimiser la rentabilité du réseau.

6.2.7 Dans les zones d'habitation dotées d'une infrastructure d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées sous forme de réseau  :

a) les nouveaux biens-fonds mis en valeur doivent être raccordés à ce réseau;

b) les biens-fonds déjà mis en valeur qui ont une infrastructure d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées sur place devront être raccordés au réseau de façon graduelle.

L'obligation de raccorder au réseau les biens-fonds mis en valeur ne s'applique pas s'il est prouvé que le prolongement du réseau est matériellement impossible.

6.2.8 Dans le cas d'un bien-fonds qui n'est pas destiné à être raccordé à un réseau d'aqueduc et d'égout, les exigences qui suivent s'appliquent :

a) le lot où se fera la mise en valeur doit avoir une superficie d'au moins deux acres ou être conforme au Règlement sur les systèmes de gestion autonomes d'eaux résiduaires, R.M. 83/2003, pour permettre l'aménagement d'un champ d'épuration;

b) s'il est prévu que l'usage du bien-fonds exigera de l'eau potable, une source d'eau potable pouvant assurer l'approvisionnement en eau potable sur place à long terme doit être identifiée.

6.2.9 Lorsque le prolongement du réseau d'aqueduc et d'égout au-delà des limites d'une zone d'habitation est envisagé, il faut tenir compte de la zone et notamment de la région ou des régions susceptibles d'être touchées par le prolongement.

6.2.10 Il n'est pas permis de prolonger le réseau d'une infrastructure municipale d'approvisionnement en eau et de traitement des eaux usées au-delà des limites d'un centre urbain, sauf si le prolongement vise, selon le cas :

a) à régler des problèmes environnementaux ou liés à la santé et la sécurité que pose une mise en valeur existante et non pas à permettre de nouvelles mises en valeur à la périphérie d'un centre urbain existant;

b) à viabiliser une nouvelle industrie ou une nouvelle institution importante dans une zone rurale.

6.3  Gestion de l'élimination des déchets solides

Objectifs

Protéger l'environnement en planifiant des installations efficaces et suffisantes pour l'élimination des déchets solides dans la province.

Faire en sorte que les installations de déchets solides soient situées à des endroits convenables et ne compromettent pas le bien-être de la collectivité.

Politiques

6.3.1 Avant qu'un nouvel usage d'un bien-fonds ou une nouvelle mise en valeur soit approuvé, il faut obtenir la confirmation que les installations locales ou intermunicipales de déchets solides ont une capacité suffisante pour prendre en charge toute quantité supplémentaire de déchets.

6.3.2 Sous réserve de la politique 1.3.2, les installations de déchets solides doivent être établies de façon écologique et rentable afin qu'elles puissent répondre à la demande tant actuelle que future en matière d'élimination des déchets dans le district d'aménagement du territoire.

Domaine de politique no 7 : les transports

Intérêts de la province

Les transports, y compris le transport routier, ferroviaire, aérien et maritime, sont essentiels au développement durable du Manitoba. Étant donné que les transports influent sur le choix des biens-fonds utilisés ou mis en valeur ainsi que sur la façon de les utiliser ou les mettre en valeur, ils ont une incidence directe sur notre économie, notre compétitivité et notre qualité de vie. Par conséquent, le système de transport du Manitoba doit être amélioré et protégé de sorte qu'il puisse continuer d'assurer le déplacement des personnes et des biens d'une manière efficace, sécuritaire et respectueuse de l'environnement.

Le fait d'intégrer la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds et les transports favorisera des mises en valeur qui sont compatibles avec les réseaux de transport tant locaux que provinciaux. En tenant compte des transports et de l'usage des biens-fonds dans le processus de prise de décisions concernant la mise en valeur, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire peuvent prévoir et réduire au minimum les incompatibilités et les risques potentiels. Par exemple, il y a des usages des biens-fonds qui, selon leur type, leur envergure et leur fonctionnement, peuvent avoir des effets négatifs sur la fonction d'une route, causer des dangers ou accélérer la détérioration coûteuse du réseau de transport. De même, la proximité d'infrastructures de transport peut avoir une incidence négative sur de nombreux usages des biens-fonds en raison de la poussière, du bruit ou des odeurs.

Pour assurer la compétitivité du Manitoba sur les marchés mondiaux, il faut que les décisions locales concernant l'usage des biens-fonds favorisent l'efficacité d'un système de transport provincial interrelié et multimodal qui puisse assurer le déplacement des marchandises tout en continuant de répondre aux besoins liés à la mobilité et au tourisme. Ce système doit pouvoir s'adapter aux nouvelles tendances économiques et mises en valeur des ressources en plus de régler les problèmes d'accès et d'équité en matière de transport pour les collectivités du Nord et les collectivités éloignées.

Grâce à des plans de mise en valeur, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire peuvent aussi encourager des modes de mise en valeur, des combinaisons d'usages des biens-fonds et des densités en particulier qui favorisent l'utilisation du transport en commun, la marche et le cyclisme, de manière à réduire la dépendance à l'égard des véhicules à occupant unique. De plus, ces plans soutiennent l'engagement pris par le Manitoba dans le cadre du Protocole de Kyoto concernant la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre et améliorent la durabilité puisqu'ils proposent un éventail de moyens de transport accessibles qui réduisent au minimum les effets négatifs sur l'environnement, les pressions exercées sur les infrastructures existantes et les coûts liés à l'aménagement d'infrastructures dans l'avenir.

7.1  Système de transport intégré

Objectifs

Améliorer l'intégration et la connectivité des différents modes de transport pour les personnes et les biens.

Accroître la connectivité entre les itinéraires et les liens entre les usages des biens-fonds et les mises en valeur.

Politiques

7.1.1 Pour assurer l'établissement et le maintien de liens appropriés dans l'ensemble du système de transport du Manitoba, il faut que les décisions concernant la planification et la mise en valeur soient coordonnées avec les plans de transport locaux, régionaux et provinciaux.

7.1.2 Il faut désigner des corridors et encourager leur création si des services publics importants, des sentiers et d'autres emprises de transport peuvent occuper un espace commun.

7.1.3 Pour assurer la compatibilité entre les mises en valeur et le réseau de transport et réduire au minimum les incompatibilités potentielles, il faut limiter les mises en valeur dans une zone lorsque, selon le cas :

a) les effets négatifs d'une installation de transport importante située à proximité, comme le bruit, la poussière ou la nature dangereuse des marchandises associées à l'installation de transport, ne peuvent être atténués convenablement;

b) un aéroport ou un terrain d'aviation se trouve à proximité et la mise en valeur est incompatible avec la navigation aérienne ou l'expansion d'installations aéroportuaires.

7.2  Promotion du transport en commun et du transport actif

Objectif

Favoriser les usages des biens-fonds et les mises en valeur qui répondent aux besoins des utilisateurs du transport en commun, des cyclistes, des piétons et des personnes à mobilité réduite et qui diminuent la dépendance à l'égard des automobiles en plus de réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, la pollution atmosphérique et la congestion associées à leur utilisation.

Politiques

7.2.1 Tous les moyens de transport, en particulier ceux qui sont actifs et respectueux de l'environnement comme la marche, la bicyclette et le transport en commun, doivent être encouragés.

7.2.2 Afin d'inciter les collectivités à favoriser davantage la marche et l'utilisation du transport en commun et de réduire la dépendance à l'égard des automobiles, il faut promouvoir ce qui suit :

a) l'accroissement de la densité et les usages mixtes des biens-fonds aux endroits appropriés;

b) l'établissement de liens entre le transport en commun, les rues, les trottoirs, les rivières, les sentiers et les espaces verts pour favoriser la création d'un réseau interconnecté;

c) l'utilisation des corridors de transport abandonnés pour le transport en commun et la création de sentiers;

d) l'amélioration de la connectivité entre les rues de manière à offrir des parcours directs entre les destinations et à réduire le temps de marche;

e) l'intégration de pistes cyclables et de passerelles dans les zones bâties existantes et dans la conception des nouvelles mises en valeur;

f) l'inclusion dans les mises en valeur, en particulier celles axées sur le logement abordable, de mesures visant à favoriser le transport en commun qui consistent notamment à :

i) installer les arrêts de transport en commun à des distances de marche raisonnables (entre 200 m et 400 m) des zones résidentielles, commerciales ou institutionnelles,

ii) établir des parcs de stationnement incitatifs sécuritaires à des endroits appropriés,

iii) mettre en œuvre des mesures de priorité au transport en commun destinées à faciliter la circulation des véhicules de transport en commun et à assurer l'efficacité globale;

g) la concentration des usages qui génèrent beaucoup de circulation ainsi que des espaces publics aux terminus et arrêts de transport en commun existants ou prévus ou à proximité.

7.3  Déplacement sécuritaire et efficace des biens et des personnes

Objectifs

Accroître le commerce et le tourisme en favorisant la circulation efficace et fluide des biens et des personnes.

Améliorer la sécurité du système de transport du Manitoba pour la circulation motorisée ou non motorisée.

Protéger les investissements publics dans les transports en veillant à ce que la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds et les décisions connexes préservent l'efficacité et la sécurité du système de transport.

Politiques

7.3.1 La planification de l'usage des biens-fonds doit tenir compte des besoins en matière d'accès ainsi que des répercussions des mises en valeur sur la circulation et la sécurité.

7.3.2 Les décisions relatives aux mises en valeur doivent tenir compte des exigences de la Loi sur les infrastructures de transport concernant l'accès direct aux routes commerciales, aux principales routes touristiques et au réseau routier régional. Pour les besoins de la présente politique, les routes commerciales et les principales routes touristiques sont indiquées sur la carte figurant à l'appendice 3.

7.3.3 Les mises en valeur linéaires, ou celles contribuant à la création d'une rangée de lots, qui bordent une route provinciale et qui exigent un accès direct à la route en question ne doivent pas être autorisées. Une exemption peut être accordée dans le cas d'une route régionale si une mise en valeur sur un bien-fonds adjacent a déjà été réalisée et que la présente politique ne peut être pleinement appliquée. Pour les besoins de la présente politique, le terme « route régionale » s'entend des routes régionales indiquées sur la carte figurant à l'appendice 3.

7.3.4 Les mises en valeur doivent se faire dans des zones qui ont déjà des intersections dotées d'une signalisation améliorée ou qui dépendent d'un réseau routier interne.

7.3.5 Une mise en valeur susceptible d'avoir des effets négatifs sur un projet d'élargissement ou d'expansion d'une route ne doit pas être autorisée, à moins que des dispositions ne prévoient une expansion ou un élargissement ultérieur.

7.3.6 L'expansion d'une mise en valeur existante qui est limitée d'un côté par un corridor de transport, comme une route provinciale, une route principale ou une voie ferrée, doit se faire dans la partie exploitée du corridor de sorte que la sécurité des utilisateurs et l'efficacité ne soient pas compromises.

7.3.7 Une mise en valeur projetée qui risque de compromettre le fonctionnement, la sécurité, la fonction ou l'expansion d'une route provinciale, d'une route d'hiver provinciale, d'un futur corridor saisonnier, d'une installation d'accostage ou d'un port ne doit être autorisée que si des mesures d'atténuation appropriées peuvent y être intégrées.

7.3.8 Les aéroports et les installations intermodales doivent être protégés contre les usages incompatibles des biens-fonds qui peuvent avoir des effets négatifs sur leur fonctionnement, compromettre la sécurité du public ou créer des risques pour la sécurité.

7.3.9 Il faut planifier et concevoir les nouveaux usages des biens-fonds ou mises en valeur de manière à créer le moins de nouveaux passages à niveau possible.

7.3.10 Une mise en valeur qui prévoit la circulation de camions transportant des charges supérieures à ce qui est autorisé sur une route provinciale ou une route locale ne doit pas être autorisée, à moins que des dispositions visant à apporter les améliorations nécessaires aux routes ne soient intégrées au plan de mise en valeur, s'il en existe un.

R.M. 55/2019

Domaine de politique no 8 : les ressources minérales

Intérêts de la province

Les minéraux sont des ressources non renouvelables qui nous sont indispensables. Cependant, le rôle qu'ils jouent dans notre bien-être matériel est souvent négligé. Les gens du Manitoba utilisent les minéraux sous diverses formes, les combinent de différentes manières et les intègrent à une foule de produits. Par exemple, le nickel, le cuivre et le zinc qui proviennent des mines du Manitoba sont essentiels à la fabrication de produits tels que les autobus, les avions et le matériel de soins de santé. En outre, l'exploitation minière est un élément crucial de l'économie. Elle procure de nombreux emplois et c'est la deuxième industrie de ressources primaires après l'agriculture. Une bonne partie des minéraux du Manitoba sont exportés et représentent une part considérable des marchandises exportées de la province.

Les mines et les droits miniers de la province, y compris les redevances, appartiennent au Manitoba et relèvent de lui. La province a un double régime foncier selon lequel les droits de surface et les droits miniers peuvent être séparés et appartenir à des parties différentes. Par conséquent, il existe des risques d'incompatibilité concernant l'accès, l'usage et l'occupation. Il est dans l'intérêt de la province de respecter les droits touchant l'accès aux minéraux et leur mise en valeur associés aux aliénations minières et de veiller à ce que les droits d'utilisation des biens-fonds soient respectés.

L'exploration minière et la mise en valeur des minéraux sont des usages temporaires des biens-fonds. Il est essentiel d'avoir accès aux biens-fonds susceptibles de contenir des minéraux afin de pouvoir produire des matériaux de construction ou autres qui contribuent au bien-être économique et social des gens du Manitoba.

L'industrie des agrégats et des minéraux de carrière du Manitoba produit des matières premières essentielles pour répondre aux besoins des secteurs privé et public en matière de construction et d'infrastructure. Il n'existe aucun produit de remplacement économique pour la plupart des utilisations finales de ces ressources non renouvelables. Il est donc dans l'intérêt public de protéger les ressources en agrégats et en minéraux de carrière de grande qualité contre les usages incompatibles de la surface des biens-fonds afin de réduire le plus possible les coûts de construction et les coûts environnementaux. L'extraction des minéraux de carrière, et notamment des agrégats, est la principale activité minière au Manitoba d'après la superficie de terrain travaillée et le volume produit. Pour l'extraction d'autres types de minéraux de carrière, par exemple la récolte de la tourbe de mousse de sphaigne, des exigences et des facteurs particuliers concernant l'usage des biens-fonds et la planification s'appliquent.

8.1  Planification des ressources minérales

Objectifs

Assurer l'accès aux ressources minérales, pétrolières et gazières ainsi que les droits de mise en valeur associés aux aliénations minières en protégeant les ressources minérales, pétrolières et gazières ayant une valeur économique contre les usages des biens-fonds qui pourraient empêcher l'exploration, l'extraction et la mise en valeur.

Assurer à long terme la protection des biens-fonds à haute et à moyenne teneur en minéraux ainsi que l'accès à ces biens-fonds.

Faire en sorte que les méthodes d'extraction et d'exploitation des minéraux de carrière soient respectueuses de l'environnement.

Politiques

8.1.1 Les ressources minérales, pétrolières et gazières, y compris les biens-fonds à haute teneur en minéraux comme les zones de roches vertes et la ceinture nickélifère de Thompson, doivent être désignées et protégées contre les usages incompatibles de la surface qui pourraient compromettre l'accès à ces ressources.

8.1.2 Seuls les usages qui sont compatibles avec l'exploration, l'extraction et la mise en valeur des ressources doivent être autorisés sur les biens-fonds adjacents à ceux visés à la politique 8.1.1. En outre, il faut désigner des zones tampons appropriées et les faire respecter de sorte que les usages des biens-fonds adjacents ne limitent pas outre mesure l'exploration, l'extraction et la mise en valeur.

8.1.3 Sans que soit limitée la portée générale de la politique 8.1.1, conformément à la désignation provinciale de biens-fonds en relation avec les ressources minérales, pétrolières et gazières, les exigences qui suivent s'appliquent :

a) dans le cas d'une zone désignée « à haute teneur », l'exploration et l'extraction doivent constituer les usages dominants des biens-fonds;

b) dans le cas d'une zone désignée « à moyenne teneur », des usages incompatibles de la surface des biens-fonds ne peuvent être autorisés que si la province est consultée et donne son approbation.

Pour l'application de la présente politique, la province désignera les zones ci-dessous à titre de zones à haute teneur ou de zones à moyenne teneur.

Zones à haute teneur

Les zones de gestion des minéraux et les biens-fonds à usage limité désignés en vertu de la Loi sur les mines et les minéraux.

Les zones contenant des gisements connus de ressources minérales, pétrolières ou gazières précieuses.

Les zones présentant d'excellentes possibilités de découverte de gisements de ressources minérales, pétrolières ou gazières précieuses.

Les zones contenant des claims miniers valides ou faisant l'objet d'un bail de minéraux de carrière en règle, si l'usage existant de la surface des biens-fonds permet l'exploration et l'extraction.

Zones à moyenne teneur

Les zones contenant des gisements connus de ressources minérales, pétrolières ou gazières qui sont de qualité moyenne ou dont le plein potentiel n'a pas été démontré.

Les zones pour lesquelles un permis d'exploration ou une licence d'exploration de carrière a été délivré.

8.1.4 L'exploitation et la mise en valeur des minéraux, du pétrole et du gaz naturel doivent être reconnues comme des usages temporaires des biens-fonds. Par conséquent, un usage compatible peut être autorisé sur la surface des zones désignées « à haute teneur » ou « à moyenne teneur » par la province avant le début de la mise en valeur et de l'extraction.

8.1.5 Le régime minier et les droits miniers doivent être bien intégrés à la planification des ressources et des usages des biens-fonds. Les droits d'accès aux minéraux en vigueur — y compris le droit d'entrer sur la surface d'un bien-fonds, de l'utiliser et de l'occuper dans le but de faire de la prospection ou de l'exploration, ou de préparer, d'exploiter et de produire des minéraux  — et les droits d'utilisation des biens-fonds doivent être respectés.

8.1.6 Avant d'établir un usage visant à autoriser la récolte de la tourbe de mousse de sphaigne à des fins commerciales, il faut tenir compte notamment des besoins en matière d'accès et des effets potentiels du drainage à l'extérieur du bien-fonds.

8.1.7 Si l'extraction de minéraux, de pétrole ou de gaz naturel cesse sur un bien-fonds dont la surface constituait une terre agricole à fort rendement avant le début de l'extraction, il faut remettre le bien-fonds en état de sorte que la qualité moyenne du sol à des fins agricoles soit la même que celle des biens-fonds avoisinants.

Domaine de politique no 9 : la région de la capitale

Intérêts de la province

Même si la région de la capitale ne représente que 1,2 % du territoire du Manitoba, c'est là que se trouvent plus des deux tiers de la population de même que le centre économique de la région, c'est-à-dire Winnipeg.

La ville de Winnipeg revêt une importance particulière pour la province puisqu'elle est le centre économique et la ville la plus populeuse du Manitoba. Par conséquent, il convient que le gouvernement provincial, qui représente l'ensemble de la population, se préoccupe de la façon don't Winnipeg et les municipalités avoisinantes qui forment la région de la capitale se développent. Il est important pour la province que la planification soutienne le développement durable et stratégique et tire parti des possibilités qui contribuent à la compétitivité de la région par rapport à d'autres régions semblables du Canada.

La région de la capitale est unique au Manitoba du point de vue de l'usage des biens-fonds et de la mise en valeur. Sa petite superficie par rapport à la portée et à la diversité des usages des biens-fonds et des intérêts qu'on y trouve accroît les risques d'incompatibilité entre les usages des biens-fonds. Par exemple, la région de la capitale est située dans la vallée de la rivière Rouge, un secteur qui renferme quelques-unes des meilleures terres agricoles du Canada mais qui subit aussi d'importantes inondations. Pour que la région se développe de façon rationnelle et durable, il faut planifier les mises en valeur de manière à assurer la croissance tout en protégeant ces terres précieuses et en empêchant les inondations.

Par ailleurs, de nombreux problèmes, qu'ils soient liés au transport, au drainage ou à l'eau, touchent plusieurs municipalités, et les mises en valeur dans une municipalité ont souvent une incidence sur une autre municipalité. Ces situations peuvent entraîner des conflits, mais il est possible de les éviter ou de les réduire au minimum en collaborant. C'est pourquoi la province favorise l'adoption d'une approche de coordination régionale pour la planification et la mise en valeur dans la région de la capitale.

9.1  Planification pour la région de la capitale

Objectif

Faire en sorte que la région de la capitale, avec en son centre une ville dynamique, se développe de façon sécuritaire, saine et prospère grâce à une collaboration et des partenariats régionaux renforcés.

Politiques

9.1.1 Il faut promouvoir l'uniformité à l'échelle régionale en encourageant la coordination et l'intégration des politiques concernant les plans de mise en valeur dans la région de la capitale.

9.1.2 Afin de consolider et de promouvoir l'avantage concurrentiel de la région de la capitale par rapport à d'autres centres canadiens, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire dans la région doivent collaborer à l'élaboration de stratégies régionales portant sur ce qui suit :

a) le développement économique durable;

b) l'immigration;

c) la gestion de la croissance;

d) l'intégration des réseaux de transport;

e) la mise en valeur du tourisme, du patrimoine et des loisirs;

f) la qualité de l'eau et l'approvisionnement en eau;

g) la gestion des déchets solides et des eaux usées;

h) la protection et la diversification des terres agricoles;

i) la gestion des zones riveraines;

j) d'autres sujets déterminés par consensus.

9.1.3 Il faut coordonner la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds dans la région de la capitale de manière à protéger et à exploiter ses principaux avantages économiques, notamment :

a) les installations de transport intermodales;

b) le corridor de commerce du centre du continent pour le développement de l'industrie des transports aérien, ferroviaire et routier;

c) l'Aéroport international James Armstrong Richardson de Winnipeg et son fonctionnement 24 heures sur 24 ainsi que le regroupement des mises en valeur industrielles à proximité de l'aéroport;

d) les installations biomédicales regroupées à Winnipeg;

e) tout autre nouveau secteur de croissance économique relevé dans la région de la capitale.

9.1.4 Pour faire ressortir l'attrait que présente la région de la capitale du Manitoba en tant qu'endroit où il fait bon vivre, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent collaborer à l'élaboration de plans coordonnés visant à fournir ou à assurer ce qui suit dans la région :

a) un éventail de possibilités en matière de logement et de transport;

b) des services publics efficaces, durables et respectueux de l'environnement;

c) diverses commodités liées aux loisirs, à la culture ou à l'éducation;

d) des quartiers sains et sécuritaires;

e) des parcs, des espaces ouverts, des zones fauniques, des richesses du patrimoine et des secteurs riverains reliés par des pistes ou des sentiers pouvant être utilisés par les cyclistes et les piétons;

f) la gestion du littoral et des zones riveraines pour protéger la qualité de l'eau, accroître la stabilité et prévenir l'érosion.

9.1.5 La politique concernant les plans de mise en valeur pour les centres urbains dans la région de la capitale doit promouvoir le développement de collectivités durables qui offrent des possibilités d'emploi, de magasinage et de divertissement aux résidents.

9.1.6 Pour favoriser la prestation efficace et rentable des services publics, les collectivités de la région de la capitale  doivent collaborer afin d'exploiter les possibilités d'offrir des services sur une base régionale et de partager des revenus.

PARTIE 4
PLANS DE MISE EN VALEUR

Intérêts de la province

Les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire sont responsables de la planification de l'usage des biens-fonds dans leur propre zone d'aménagement du territoire. Pour faciliter les mises en valeur et la gestion du changement, elles adoptent des règlements portant sur un plan de mise en valeur.

Les règlements portant sur un plan de mise en valeur énoncent les objectifs et les politiques qui s'appliquent aux mises en valeur dans une zone d'aménagement du territoire. Ils constituent la pierre angulaire du processus décisionnel concernant les usages des biens-fonds et les mises en valeur et doivent être tenus à jour de sorte qu'ils reflètent les objectifs et la vision don't s'est dotée la collectivité. En outre, les règlements doivent respecter les droits des peuples autochtones et les droits issus des traités ainsi que les exigences en matière de consultation.

Même si les décisions concernant l'usage des biens-fonds sont prises à l'échelle locale, la province a des intérêts directs dans la façon don't l'usage des biens-fonds et des ressources est planifié et don't la mise en valeur se fait au Manitoba. Les PPUB expriment cet intérêt, et les règlements portant sur un plan de mise en valeur doivent être généralement conformes à ces politiques.

Le terme « généralement conforme » signifie que les règlements portant sur un plan de mise en valeur intègrent les principes d'une planification judicieuse de l'usage des biens-fonds qui sont énoncés dans les PPUB, et les objectifs, plans et politiques figurant dans ces règlements reflètent l'esprit et l'intention des PPUB. C'est là un détail important parce qu'une fois qu'un règlement portant sur un plan de mise en valeur est adopté, les PPUB cessent de s'appliquer à la zone d'aménagement du territoire jusqu'à ce que le plan fasse l'objet de modifications ou d'une révision. Pour cette raison, un règlement portant sur un plan de mise en valeur doit obtenir l'appui et l'approbation de l'autorité chargée de l'aménagement du territoire et de la province.

Pour assurer la cohérence et la qualité des règlements portant sur un plan de mise en valeur, il faut se conformer aux exigences ci-dessous, qui indiquent comment les plans doivent être élaborés, modifiés et examinés. Par ailleurs, les domaines de politique énoncés dans les PPUB correspondent au contenu qui doit figurer dans les règlements puisque ces domaines reflètent les intérêts de la province.

En outre, les politiques qui figurent dans les règlements portant sur un plan de mise en valeur doivent venir appuyer les politiques contenues dans d'autres plans locaux ou régionaux, notamment les plans intégrés de gestion des bassins hydrographiques, les plans de transport, les plans municipaux d'urgence et de continuité des activités et les plans d'action sur les changements climatiques.

Les plans de mise en valeur doivent respecter les droits issus des traités et les droits des peuples autochtones ainsi que les exigences en matière de consultation.

Le but premier est de faire en sorte que les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire adoptent des règlements complets et intégrés portant sur un plan de mise en valeur, à l'intérieur du cadre stratégique provincial global qui soutient le développement durable du Manitoba et reflète les intérêts de la province et les besoins locaux en matière de biens-fonds, de ressources et de mise en valeur.

Formulation d'une vision à long terme

1(1)   Les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent, lorsqu'elles élaborent leur plan de mise en valeur, formuler une vision à long terme qui favorise la santé et le bien-être des résidents et soutient l'économie et l'environnement de la zone d'aménagement du territoire et elles doivent établir des objectifs, des politiques et des échéances pour concrétiser la vision.

1(2)   Lorsqu'elles examinent ou modifient leur plan de mise en valeur, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent veiller à ce que :

a) leur vision à long terme soit examinée et mise à jour au besoin;

b) les modifications tiennent compte de la vision à long terme.

Coordination

2(1)   Les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent faire en sorte que leur plan de mise en valeur concorde et soit coordonné avec ce qui suit :

a) d'autres plans utiles;

b) les plans approuvés par la province pour l'amélioration du réseau routier.

Elles doivent aussi s'assurer que les politiques contenues dans les divers plans visés à l'alinéa a) se renforcent mutuellement.

2(2)   Pour l'application du paragraphe (1) et sans que soit limitée la portée générale de ce paragraphe, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent tenir compte de ce qui suit lorsqu'elles élaborent leur plan de mise en valeur :

a) les plans de mise en valeur des zones de la même région que celle relevant d'elles, et en particulier les plans de mise en valeur des zones adjacentes à la zone d'aménagement du territoire;

b) les plans environnementaux locaux, y compris tout plan d'action sur les changements climatiques applicable;

c) les plans intégrés de gestion des bassins hydrographiques et les plans relatifs aux bassins ou aux formations aquifères qui ont été établis pour une partie de la zone d'aménagement du territoire;

d) les plans locaux de gestion des eaux usées et d'approvisionnement en eau potable;

e) les plans de transport;

f) les plans de gestion de l'accès qui sont fondés sur la hiérarchie des routes locales et les prévisions du trafic routier.

2(3)   Les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent consulter la Commission des finances des écoles publiques et les divisions scolaires locales pour s'assurer que leur plan de mise en valeur et tout plan secondaire ultérieur :

a) contiennent des politiques convenables visant à répondre aux besoins de la Commission et des divisions scolaires;

b) tiennent compte des conséquences à long terme que la présence d'établissements d'enseignement publics aura dans la zone d'aménagement du territoire du point de vue de l'usage et de la mise en valeur des biens-fonds.

Exigences relatives au plan de mise en valeur

3(1)   Le plan de mise en valeur doit indiquer l'emplacement des ressources et des caractéristiques environnementales et faire une comparaison avec l'emplacement de mises en valeur existantes afin de déterminer les possibilités et les limites en matière de croissance dans la zone d'aménagement du territoire.

3(2)   Le plan de mise en valeur doit indiquer la hiérarchie des routes locales qui détermine les fonctions et l'importance de ces routes et la place qu'elles occupent dans les réseaux de transport régional et provincial. Pour l'application de la présente politique, le réseau de transport provincial englobe les routes provinciales à grande circulation, les routes provinciales secondaires, les routes saisonnières, les aéroports, les voies ferrées et les installations connexes ainsi que les installations d'accostage qui sont indiqués sur la carte figurant à l'appendice 3.

Analyses et enquêtes

4(1)   Lorsqu'elles élaborent, modifient ou remplacent un plan de mise en valeur, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent effectuer les analyses et enquêtes appropriées et nécessaires concernant la zone d'aménagement du territoire qui portent notamment sur ce qui suit :

a) la capacité économique et financière de la zone d'aménagement du territoire de soutenir la mise en valeur et d'en assumer les coûts;

b) les ressources agricoles et forestières, la faune, les minéraux, les richesses du patrimoine et les terres naturelles que renferme la zone d'aménagement du territoire;

c) la mesure dans laquelle les ressources présentes dans la zone d'aménagement du territoire, telles que l'eau, peuvent soutenir la mise en valeur;

d) les projections démographiques;

e) l'offre et la demande relatives à l'usage des biens-fonds, notamment aux usages résidentiels;

f) le parc de logements existant et les besoins prévus en matière de logement;

g) les effets de la mise en valeur sur la circulation et les moyens de répondre aux besoins de transport futurs;

h) les quantités et sources actuelles et prévues d'émissions de gaz à effet de serre;

i) les besoins actuels et futurs de la zone d'aménagement du territoire concernant l'approvisionnement en eau et la gestion des eaux usées et les moyens de répondre à ces besoins;

j) la vulnérabilité de la zone d'aménagement du territoire aux changements climatiques;

k) d'autres questions liées aux caractéristiques physiques, environnementales, sociales, culturelles ou économiques actuelles ou futures de la zone d'aménagement du territoire qui peuvent être utiles pour le plan de mise en valeur.

4(2)   Les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent entreprendre les analyses et enquêtes exigées avec l'aide de professionnels compétents du domaine de la planification ou de disciplines connexes et faire en sorte que le niveau de détail et la complexité des analyses et enquêtes soient adaptés aux particularités locales et à la question à l'étude.

Usages des biens-fonds à long terme

5(1)   Les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent veiller à ce que leur plan de mise en valeur prévoie une combinaison appropriée d'usages des biens-fonds, en fonction du contexte régional, de manière à répondre aux besoins prévus de la zone d'aménagement du territoire.

5(2)   Pour faire en sorte que les besoins prévus soient satisfaits, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent :

a) à l'aide des taux de croissance récents et prévus :

i) prévoir un nombre suffisant de lots viabilisés afin de répondre à la demande pour divers usages des biens-fonds à moyen terme,

ii) désigner les usages des biens-fonds et déterminer les secteurs à mettre en valeur à long terme;

b) tenir compte de l'offre et de la demande régionales relatives à l'usage pour la désignation des biens-fonds.

5(3)   Dans le cadre de la planification à moyen et à long terme, les autorités chargées de l'aménagement du territoire doivent désigner les services publics prévus ou exigés pour ces horizons de planification et prévoir la façon dont seront assumées les dépenses relatives à ces services.

Incompatibilité

6   Les dispositions d'un texte législatif en vigueur dans la province l'emportent sur les dispositions incompatibles d'un règlement portant sur un plan de mise en valeur.

PARTIE 5
EXPLOITATIONS DE BÉTAIL

DISPOSITIONS INTRODUCTIVES

Définitions

1(1)   Les définitions qui suivent s'appliquent à la présente partie.

« bassin collecteur » Ouvrage :

a) servant à recueillir les eaux de ruissellement contaminées par les déjections d'une exploitation agricole;

b) réalisé principalement à l'aide de terre par excavation ou aménagement de levées. ("collection basin")

« installation de stockage de déjections en terre » Ouvrage réalisé principalement à l'aide de terre, érigé par excavation ou aménagement de levées et servant au stockage ou au traitement des déjections. La présente définition exclut :

a) les bassins collecteurs;

b) les lieux de stockage dans un champ;

c) les lieux temporaires de compostage des déjections. ("earthen manure storage facility")

« installation de stockage de déjections non réalisée à l'aide de terre » Ouvrage non réalisé à l'aide de terre, notamment un monticule ou une cuve, servant au stockage ou au traitement des déjections. La présente définition exclut les rigoles et les fosses en béton servant au stockage des déjections liquides ou semi-solides pendant une période de moins de 30 jours en vue de leur acheminement jusqu'à une installation de stockage de déjections. ("non-earthen manure storage facility")

« lieu de stockage dans un champ » Lieu où les déjections solides de bétail sont entreposées à l'air libre, à l'exclusion des installations de stockage de déjections en terre et des installations de stockage de déjections non réalisées à l'aide de terre. ("field storage site")

« Loi » La Loi sur l'aménagement du territoire. ("Act")

« monticule » Ouvrage dans lequel les déjections du bétail sont injectées mécaniquement à l'aide d'un tuyau et forment un amas. ("molehill")

« résidence » S'entend notamment de toute résidence légalement en cours de construction et de toute résidence à l'égard de laquelle un permis de construction a été délivré. ("residence")

« unité animale » Nombre d'animaux d'une catégorie particulière de bétail qui excrétera un total de 73 kg d'azote au cours d'une période de 12 mois. ("animal unit")

1(2)   Sous réserve de l'article 2, pour l'application de la Loi et du présent règlement, « catégorie de bétail » s'entend de toute catégorie de bétail prévue à la colonne 1 du tableau de l'appendice 2.

Détermination du nombre d'unités animales d'une exploitation de bétail

2   Pour l'application de la Loi et du présent règlement, le nombre total d'unités animales d'une exploitation de bétail correspond à la somme des unités animales, déterminées conformément à l'article 3, produites par chaque catégorie de bétail de l'exploitation.

Détermination des unités animales

3(1)   Dans le cas d'animaux faisant partie d'une catégorie de bétail visée à la colonne 1 du tableau de l'appendice 2, le nombre d'unités animales de la catégorie correspond au nombre d'animaux de la catégorie divisé par le facteur indiqué à la colonne 3 du tableau à l'égard de cette catégorie de bétail.

3(2)   Dans le cas d'animaux ne faisant pas partie d'une catégorie de bétail indiquée à la colonne 1 du tableau de l'appendice 2, le nombre d'animaux qui constituent une unité animale correspond au nombre d'animaux de cette catégorie qui excréteront un total de 73 kg d'azote au cours d'une période de 12 mois.

3(3)   Pour l'application du paragraphe (2), les catégories de bétail ainsi que la quantité d'azote qu'un animal d'une catégorie de bétail excrétera au cours d'une période de 12 mois sont déterminées en fonction des lignes directrices ou des normes publiées ou approuvées par le ministère de l'Agriculture, de l'Alimentation et des Initiatives rurales du Manitoba.

EXIGENCES EN MATIÈRE D'EMPLACEMENT
ET DE DISTANCES DE RETRAIT

Normes en matière d'emplacement

4(1)   Les normes minimales d'emplacement d'une exploitation de bétail nouvelle ou agrandie que fixent les règlements de zonage doivent être compatibles avec les distances de retrait minimales prévues au tableau de l'appendice 1.

4(2)   Les distances de retrait servant à déterminer l'emplacement d'une exploitation de bétail nouvelle ou agrandie ne peuvent être déterminées qu'en fonction des résidences et des zones désignées qui existent le jour où la municipalité visée reçoit la demande de mise en valeur ou d'expansion de l'exploitation de bétail.

4(3)   Il n'est pas tenu compte des résidences, ni des autocaravanes et des remorques, liées à une exploitation de bétail lorsqu'il est déterminé si l'exploitation nouvelle ou agrandie répond aux normes minimales en matière d'emplacement prévues au tableau de l'appendice 1 et au règlement de zonage applicable.

4(4)   Il est entendu que les normes en matière d'emplacement prévues au paragraphe (1) ne s'appliquent pas à toute exploitation de bétail qui, avant l'entrée en vigueur du présent article, répond à un des critères suivants :

a) le conseil de la municipalité l'a approuvée;

b) un permis d'aménagement valide a été délivré à son égard;

c) elle était légalement en exploitation;

d) elle était légalement en construction.

Normes en matière de retrait

5   Les normes minimales en matière de retrait pour une exploitation de bétail nouvelle ou agrandie que fixent les règlements de zonage doivent être compatibles avec les exigences minimales en matière de retrait à l'égard des limites de propriété et des plans d'eau que prescrit le Règlement sur la gestion des animaux morts et des déjections de bétail, R.M. 42/98.

EXPLOITATIONS DE BÉTAIL LIÉES

Exploitation de bétail unique

6   Pour l'application de l'alinéa 1.1b) de la Loi en ce qui a trait aux propriétaires liés, les exploitations de bétail existantes ou proposées sont réputées constituer une seule exploitation dans l'un ou l'autre des cas suivants :

1.Une personne est propriétaire d'une exploitation et son conjoint ou conjoint de fait qui cohabite avec elle est propriétaire de l'autre.

2.Deux ou plusieurs exploitations appartiennent à des corporations différentes et la même personne ou entité est titulaire, directement ou indirectement, d'au moins 50 % des actions avec droit de vote de chacune des corporations.

3.Deux ou plusieurs exploitations appartiennent à des sociétés en nom collectif distinctes qui ont au moins un associé en commun.

4.Une exploitation appartient à une personne et une autre appartient :

a) soit à une corporation et la personne est titulaire, directement ou indirectement, d'au moins 50 % des actions avec droit de vote de la corporation;

b) soit à une société en nom collectif et la personne est également associée au sein de cette société.

5.Une exploitation appartient à une corporation et une autre appartient à une société en nom collectif et, selon le cas :

a) la corporation est également associée au sein de la société;

b) la société, ou un de ses associés, est titulaire, directement ou indirectement, d'au moins 50 % des actions avec droit de vote de la corporation.

APPENDICE 1

DISTANCES DE RETRAIT MINIMALES RELATIVES À L'EMPLACEMENT DES EXPLOITATIONS DE BÉTAIL

[Paragraphe 4(1) de la partie 5]

Distance en mètres (pieds)
entre une résidence
Distance en mètres (pieds)
entre une zone désignée
Taille de l'exploitation de bétail en unités animales et l'installation de stockage de déjections en terre ou le parc d'engraissement et l'installation de confinement pour animaux ou de stockage de déjections non réalisée à l'aide de terre et l'installation de stockage de déjections en terre ou le parc d'engraissement et l'installation de confinement pour animaux ou de stockage de déjections non réalisée à l'aide de terre
10 – 100 200 (656) 100 (328) 800 (2 625) 530 (1 739)
101 – 200 300 (984) 150 (492) 1 200 (3 937) 800 (2 625)
201 – 300 400 (1 312) 200 (656) 1 600 (5 249) 1 070 (3 511)
301 – 400 450 (1 476) 225 (738) 1 800 (5 906) 1 200 (3 937)
401 – 800 500 (1 640) 250 (820) 2 000 (6 561) 1 330 (4 364)
801 – 1 600 600 (1 968) 300 (984) 2 400 (7 874) 1 600 (5 249)
1 601 – 3 200 700 (2 297) 350 (1 148) 350 (1 148) 2 800 2 800 (9 186) 1 870 (6 135)
3 201 – 6 400 800 (2 625) 400 (1 312) 3 200 (10 499) 2 130 (6 988)
6 401 – 12 800 900 (2 953) 450 (1 476) 3 600 (11 811) 2 400 (7 874)
>12 800 1 000 (3 281) 500 (1 640) 4 000 (13 123) 2 670 (8 760)
Définitions

Les définitions qui suivent s'appliquent à la présente annexe.

« aire d'alimentation saisonnière » Aire extérieure, à l'exception des parcs d'engraissement et des pâturages :

a) où le bétail reçoit une partie ou la totalité de son alimentation de façon saisonnière;

b) d'où les déjections doivent être déplacées mécaniquement de temps à autre en raison de leur accumulation. ("seasonal feeding area")

« installation de confinement pour animaux » Étable ou aire extérieure où le bétail est confiné par des constructions, notamment des clôtures. La présente définition comprend les aires d'alimentation saisonnières, mais exclut les parcs d'engraissement et les pâturages. ("animal confinement facility")

« parc d'engraissement » Enclos extérieur où le bétail est confiné uniquement en vue de sa croissance ou de son engraissement. La présente définition exclut les pâturages et les aires d'alimentation saisonnières. ("feedlot")

« pâturage » Aire extérieure où, pendant une partie de l'année, le bétail se nourrit principalement de fourrage qui y pousse et où les déjections ne s'accumulent pas au point où leur déplacement ou leur redistribution mécanique soit nécessaire. ("grazing area")

« zone désignée » Zone désignée à titre de centre urbain, de localité, de région résidentielle rurale, de zone de chalet, de parc ou de zone récréative dans un plan de mise en valeur. ("designated area")

APPENDICE 2

UNITÉS ANIMALES SELON LA CATÉGORIE DE BÉTAIL

[1(2) et 3(1) de la partie 5]

Colonne 1
Catégorie de bétail
Colonne 2
Unités animales produites par un animal
Colonne 3
Facteur servant à déterminer le nombre d'unités animales (nombre d'animaux nécessaires à la production d'une unité animale)
Da Bovins laitiers

Vaches laitières   (y compris le bétail connexe)

2 0.5
Bovins

Vaches d'élevage (y compris le bétail connexe)

1.25 0.8

Bovins de finition

0.5 2

Estive/génisses nécessaires à la relève

0.625 1.6

Bovins d'engraissement

0.769 1.3
Porcs

Truies, naissage-finition

1.25 0.8

Truies, naissage-sevrage

0.25 4

Truies, naissage-nursery

0.313 3.2

Porcelets sevrés

0.033 30

Porcs en croissance-finition

0.143 7

Sangliers   (insémination artificielle)

0.2 5
Volailles

Poulets à griller

0.005 200

Poulets à rôtir

0.01 100

Pondeuses

0.0083 120

Poulets

0.0033 300

Poulettes reproductrices de type à griller

0.0033 300

Poules reproductrices de type à griller

0.01 100
Dindes

Dindes à griller

0.01 100

Dindons lourds

0.02 50

Dindes lourdes

0.01 100
Chevaux

Juments (y compris le bétail connexe)

1.333 0.75
Moutons

Brebis (y compris le bétail connexe)

0.2 5

Agneaux d'engraissement

0.063 16
APPENDICE 3

RÉSEAU DE TRANSPORT PROVINCIAL

Réseau de transport provincial